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“The Women Are Coming”: Gendered Spaces of Protest

April 27, 2017IASEvents, IAS Thursdays0

“The Women Are Coming”: Gendered Spaces of Protest Thursday, April 27, 2017, at 3:30pm Crosby Seminar Room, 240 Northrop Free and open to the public

The Logic and Legacy of American Punitiveness

The Logic and Legacy of American Punitiveness Thursday, December 1, 2016, at 3:30pm Best Buy Theater, 4th Floor of Northrop Free and open to the public Download: audio, small video, or original. Recent scholarship from the colonial period to the twenty-first century reveals the archival truths of America’s enduring punishment logic, often framed in stark […]

Life, Emergent: The Social in the Afterlives of Violence

November 16, 2016IASEvents, Video and Audio0

Life, Emergent: The Social in the Afterlives of Violence Wednesday, November 16, 2016 at 1:30pm Best Buy Theater, 4th Floor Northrop Free and open to the public Download: audio, small video, or original. This panel conversation brings together the panelist’s work, their influences in Arif’s book and resonant themes. A deliberation on a politics of […]

Where is the Human in the Data?

Where is the Human in the Data? Thursday, September 29, 3:30-5:00pm: IAS Thursdays Friday, September 30, 9am—12pm Crosby Seminar Room, 240 Northrop Free and open to the public Download: audio, small video, or original. This workshop is the launching point for a critical data science study project that is jointly sponsored by the University of […]

Race, Religion, and Gender: Driving the 2016 Election

September 15, 2016IASEvents, IAS Thursdays2

Race, Religion, and Gender: Driving the 2016 Election Thursday, September 15, 2016, at 3:30pm Crosby Seminar Room, 240 Northrop Free and open to the public Image: Kehinde Wiley A panel discussion exploring how the roles of race, religion and gender are influencing American politics, and particularly the 2016 elections. Perspectives from a variety of fields […]

“Newes from the Dead”: an unnatural moment in the history of Natural Philosophy. April 21, 2016

“Newes from the Dead”: an unnatural moment in the history of Natural Philosophy Thursday, April 21, 2016, at 4:00pm Crosby Seminar Room, 240 Northrop Free and open to the public Download: audio, small video, or original. In 1650 Oxford is in the midst of the Bloody civil war, in which divine and secular authority are […]

The Analogy Problem in Human Trafficking Reform. Julietta Hua, April 7, 2016

The Analogy Problem in Human Trafficking Reform Thursday, April 7, 2016, at 4:00pm Crosby Seminar Room, 240 Northrop Free and open to the public Download: audio, small video, or original. What work takes place when slavery becomes the accepted language through which we come to understand human trafficking? Taking the website slaveryfootprint.org as a starting […]

Matteo Convertino on Complex Biological & Socio-technical Systems. Sep 2015

Download: audio, small video, or original. Matteo Convertino is Assistant Professor in the UMN School of Public Health’s Division of Environmental Health Sciences, and Principal Investigator of the HumNat Lab for Analysis, Modeling and Management of Complex Biological and Socio-technical Systems. He was also a 2014 Resident Fellow of the Institute on the Environment and […]

Spirituality After Darwin. Bron Taylor, Religion, University of Florida, April 30, 2015.

Spirituality After Darwin: ‘Dark Green’ Nature Religion and the Future of Religion and Nature Thursday, April 30, 2015, at 4:00pm Northrop — Best Buy Theater The Roetzel Family Lecture in Religious Studies. Free and open to the public. Download: small video, audio, or original. Q&A Download: small video, audio, or original. New religions come and […]

Bron Taylor, Prof. of Religion, on Dark Green Nature Religion. April 2015

Download: audio, small video, or original. Bron Taylor is Professor of Religion, Nature, and Environmental Ethics at the University of Florida, and a Carson Fellow of the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society in Munich Germany. His research involves both ethnographic and historical methods, and much of it focuses on grassroots environmental movements, their […]

Backwater Blues: Environmental Disaster and African American Experiences. March 31, 2015

Backwater Blues: Environmental Disaster and African American Experiences Tuesday, March 31, at 4:00pm 1210 Heller Hall Panel with Saje Mathieu, History; David Pellow, Sociology; Elliott Powell, American Studies; and Richard Mizelle, History, University of Houston (via Skype). Download: audio, small video, or original. What can studies of environment tell us about African American experiences? In […]

Surviving Forced Disappearance: Identity and Meaning. Gabriel Gatti, University of the Basque Country, Nov. 20, 2014

Surviving Forced Disappearance: Identity and Meaning Thursday, November 20, at 3:00pm Room 710 Social Sciences (Spanish with translation) A Conversation with Gabriel Gatti, Prof. of Sociology, University of the Basque Country Download: audio, small video, or original. Due in large part to humanitarian law and transitional justice, the categories of detained-disappeared and forced disappearance are […]

Reframing Mass Violence: Spain’s Memory Movement, May 8, 2014

Exhumations, Memory, and the Return of Civil War Ghosts in Spain Francisco Ferrandiz, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) Download as: audio, small video, or original. Q&A Download as: audio, small video, or original. Since 2000, the exhumation of mass graves from the Spanish Civil War and the Post-War years, mostly involving the largely abandoned graves […]

Reframing Mass Violence: Memory, Human Rights, & Cultural Practices, Apr. 24, 2014

Under Construction: Battles of Memory, Human Rights and Cultural Practices April 24, 2014, 3:00-4:30pm 1-109 Hanson Hall Ana Forcinito, Professor of Spanish and Portuguese, U of M. Cultural practices have played a crucial role in the construction of collective memory in Argentina, by addressing the invisibility and the silence about human rights violations, by exploring […]

IAS Thursdays: April 10, 2014 Reframing Mass Violence panel: Remembering Argentina’s Disappeared

Remembering Argentina’s Disappeared: Art, Media and Politics IAS Thursdays at Four presents a Reframing Mass Violence Collaborative panel discussion. Download as: audio, podcast video, or original. Q&A Download as: audio, podcast video, or original. Panel discussion organized by the IAS research collaborative Reframing Mass Violence. Participants include Emilio Crenzel (University of Buenos Aires), Leigh Payne (University of […]

Reframing Mass Violence: The Brazilian Truth Commission, Mar. 27, 2014

Brazilian Truth Commission: Is It Time to ‘Reframe’ the Gross Human Rights Violations? Glenda Mezarobba, United Nations Development Project Representative for the Brazilian Truth Commission Download as: audio, podcast video, or original. Q&A Download as: audio, podcast video, or original. Glenda Mezarobba provides an overview of the Brazilian Truth Commission and reflects on the meaning […]

Reframing Mass Violence: Uruguayan Memories of Dictatorship, Mar. 6, 2014

Families’ Conversations about the Dictatorship: Pedagogies of Private Transmission Mariana Achugar, Professor of Hispanic Studies, Carnegie Mellon Download as: audio, podcast video, or original. Q&A Download as: audio, podcast video, or original. Why do family conversations matter in processes of intergenerational transmission of traumatic pasts? Family conversations serve as triggers to reconstructions of memory that […]

Reframing Mass Violence: The Collective Memory of Mass Atrocities, Feb. 20, 2014

The Collective Memory of Mass Atrocities: Traveling Ghosts of the Holocaust Alejandro Baer, Professor of Sociology and Director of the Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies, U of M Download as: audio, podcast video, or original. Q&A Download as: audio, podcast video, or original. “Postmemory”, “multi-directional memory” and “cosmopolitan memory” are terms used by contemporary […]

Reframing Mass Violence: Transitional Justice and Human Rights, Jan. 23, 2014

Transitional Justice: Seeking Truth and Accountability for Systematic Human Rights Violations Barbara Frey, Director, Human Rights Program Download: audio, original Q&A Download: audio, podcast video, or original. Countries emerging from repression, armed conflict, or mass atrocities have sought ways to address the past as a part of their transition into new forms of governance and […]

Getting to Know the Maghrib from a Distance: Four decades of research among Jews from Libya – A talk by Harvey Goldberg

Harvey E. Goldberg is the emeritus Sarah Allen Shaine Chair in Sociology and Anthropology at the Hebrew University. His research concerns Jews in the Middle East, ethnic and religious identities in Israeli society, and the overlap between Anthropology and Jewish Studies. He is author of Jewish Life in Muslim Libya: Rivals and Relatives and Jewish […]

An Elusive Subject: The ‘Child Consumer’ and Recent Social History

September 22, 2011IASEvents0

Sociology Workshop Series, cosponsored with the Department of History. Daniel Cook is Director of the Graduate Studies Program in Childhood Studies at Rutgers University. His research focuses on the rise of children as consumers in the United States, presently and historically. In particular, he explores the various ways in which tensions between “the child” and […]

Daniel Winchester, Interdisciplinary Doctoral Fellow, 2010-11

Daniel Winchester (Department of Sociology, CLA) Project: “Between East and West: The Process and Politics of Conversion to Eastern Orthodoxy in the U.S.” Mentor: Jeanne Kilde (Program in Religious Studies, CLA) Winchester used his fellowship year to engage in intensive ethnographic field research among Eastern Orthodox communities in the Twin Cities. He observed and participated […]

Joseph Gerteis, Faculty Fellow, Spring 2011

Joseph Gerteis (Department of Sociology, CLA), Spring 2011 Project: “American Nationalism: Boundaries and Identities in Historical Context” Gerteis used the duration of his fellowship to think through key issues of a new project on historical dimensions of exclusion in American national identity. His conversations with other fellows helped him sharpen and define how to approach […]

Talking Over Food: Abundance and Scarcity in the 21st Century

Fall 2011 Instructors:  Valentine Cadieux (Geography) and Rachel Schurman (Sociology) Schedule: Meets Fridays 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Composition: Faculty, graduate students, and P&As Participation Information Draft syllabus Course Description: This course is designed to generate a stimulating interdisciplinary discussion about alternative understandings and implications of food abundance and scarcity in an era when both are on […]

Rick Duque, April 28, 2011

Rick Duque is a professor of Social Studies of Sciences at the University of Vienna. After finishing his Ph.D. at Louisiana State University in 2007, he was a visiting professor at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana lecturing in Environmental Sociology, Sociology of Science, Global Social Change, and the Sociology of Disaster. Since then, Prof. Duque […]

Jeffrey Broadbent, March 23, 2011

Jeffrey Broadbent is a professor of Sociology at the University of Minnesota where his current research includes “Comparing Climate Change Policy Networks,” a comparative study of national political will to deal with global climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, with research teams in 15 countries collecting equivalent network survey data. Professor Broadbent is also working on […]

How We Talk about Feeding the World

A Minnesota Futures Symposium March 3-5, 2011 Organized as part of the University Symposium on Abundance and Scarcity in collaboration with the College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resources Science and the College of Liberal Arts The goal of this symposium is to build on frameworks for discussing the complex and often contentious issues that challenge interdisciplinary attempts […]

Curriculum Associated with the University Symposium, Spring 2011

The following courses are associated with the University Symposium on Abundance and Scarcity: Sustainability Studies Internship Course SUST 4096, 2-4 credits 10:40-11:30, Wednesdays 370 VoTech Building, Institute on the Environment, St. Paul Campus Instructor: David Wanberg is a Landscape Architect, Architect and Alliance for Sustainability Board Member. Open to all majors. Intern for a government, […]

Lisa Sun-Hee Park, Faculty Fellow, Fall 2010

Lisa Sun-Hee Park (Department of Sociology, CLA), Fall 2010 Project: “The Case of the Missing Mountains: Environmental Privilege, Immigration, and the Politics of Place” Park began the fellowship having completed the first stage of her project. The comments and suggestions from fellow IAS members brought greater clarity to her ideas and encouraged her to continue […]

Professor Rachel Schurman discusses “Fighting for the Future of Food”

November 3, 2010IASEvents0

Author and University of Minnesota associate professor Rachel Schurman will discuss her book Fighting for the Future of Food: Activists versus Agribusiness in the Struggle over Biotechnology, on Wednesday, November 3 at 4:00 p.m. at the University of Minnesota Bookstore in Coffman Memorial Union, 300 Washington Ave. S.E. Minneapolis. Fighting for the Future of Food […]

Practicing Plenitude: Finding wealth in an era of scarcity – Juliet Schor

October 6, 2010IASEvents0

The twin crises of economy and ecology demand a transformative set of solutions. In this lecture, Schor will lay out her vision for an ecologically-light economy based on small-scale production, re-skilling, new patterns of time use, local economic interdependence and an extension of the open-source model beyond software into hardware. Juliet Schor is a professor […]

Joshua Page, October 2010

Joshua Page is a professor of Sociology at the University of Minnesota where his current research interests focus on crime, law, deviance, and punishment as well as labor and unionization. His recent publications include The ‘Toughest Beat’: Politics, Punishment, and the Prison Officers’ Union in California (2011), “A Game You Can’t Win – A Culture Review” (with Ross Macmillan, 2009), […]

Understanding and Implementing Care Teams: Building a Community of Practice, 2010-2011

This collaborative proposes to build a community practice focused on care teams drawing from University of Minnesota researchers and Minnesota practitioners. Care teams are interprofessional teams that are central to the effort to improve population health and contain health care costs. The collaborative seeks to break down silos and encourage integration by sharing knowledge in […]

Yu-Ju Chien, Interdisciplinary Doctoral Fellow, 2009-10

Yu-Ju Chien (Sociology, CLA): “Constructing Scientific Knowledge and Policies on Avian Influenza: International Organizations and Global Authoritative Knowledge” This fellowship allowed Chien to design and implement a survey to investigate consultancy mechanisms through which intergovernmental organizations attain and filter scientific understandings to develop avian flu policies. She has finished drafts of two dissertation chapters, both […]

Kathleen Hull, Faculty Fellow, Spring 2010

Kathleen E. Hull (Department of Sociology, CLA), Spring 2010 Project: “Beyond the Culture Wars: How Ordinary Citizens Use Religious, Legal, and Scientific Repertoires to Understand Contemporary Social Dilemmas” Working jointly with Penny Edgell, Hull used the semester at IAS to work on revising a grant proposal for resubmission to NSF for a new project examining […]

Penny Edgell, Faculty Fellow, Spring 2010

Penny Edgell (Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts), Spring 2010 Project: “Beyond the Culture Wars: How Ordinary Citizens Use Religious, Legal, and Scientific Repertoires to Understand Contemporary Social Dilemmas” While in residence Edgell read literature in several interdisciplinary areas to revise and resubmit a grant proposal to the National Science Foundation (NSF) with her […]

Rebecca Scott, April 26, 2010

Rebecca Scott is a professor of Sociology at the University of Missouri. Her current research concerns the cultural context of various transformations in the coal industry in southern West Virginia, particularly mountaintop removal coal mining. She has focused on questions of how identity formations such as whiteness, masculinity, and different class cultures intersect with Appalachian […]

Extracting Identity in the Appalachian Coalfields: Rebecca Scott, April 2010

Available for download as audio (.mp3, 48.5MB) or video (.m4v, 255.3MB). Question and Answer Session Available for download as audio (.mp3, 36.0MB) or video (.m4v, 177.8MB). Removing Mountains: Extracting Nature and Identity in the Appalachian Coalfields Rebecca Scott is a professor of Sociology at the University of Missouri. Her current research concerns the cultural context […]

Minding the Gap – Changing the Clockworks of Work: Presentation by Phyllis Moen and Erin Kelly, February 18, 2010

Erin Kelly and Phyllis Moen are professors of Sociology at the University of Minnesota and co-principal investigators of the Flexible Work and Well-Being Center, part of the Work, Family, and Health Network funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control. Here they describe the need for employers and policy makers to […]