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Dream of the Red Chamber and women’s literary culture in late imperial China

Dream of the Red Chamber and the evolving shape of women’s literary culture in late imperial China Thursday, April 20, 2017, at 3:30pm Crosby Seminar Room, 240 Northrop Free and open to the public Download: audio, 360p, or 1080p. Chinese women’s literary culture shows considerable evolution between the sixteenth and early twentieth centuries. Communications grow […]

dc edwards, Afrofuturist/fantasy writer

Download: audio, small video, or original. dc edwards is a writer who works at the U of M.

Building the Dream of the Red Chamber. Bright Sheng and David Henry Hwang, November 2015

November 7, 2015IASVideo and Audio0

Download: audio, small video, or original. Composer Bright Sheng and playwright David Henry Hwang discuss their new opera Dream of the Red Chamber with Ann Waltner, Prof. of History at the University of Minnesota.

After the American Century: The Ends of U.S. Culture in the Middle East. Oct. 5, 2015

October 5, 2015IASEvents0

After the American Century: The End of U.S. Culture in the Middle East Monday, October 5, 2015, at 2:30pm 125 Nolte Center Free and open to the public When Henry Luce announced in 1941 that we were living in the “American century,” he believed that the international popularity of American culture made the world favorable […]

John Reimringer, Novelist, and Katrina Vandenberg, Poet, on Writing and Parenthood, 2011-2015

Katrina Vandenberg, poet and creative non-fiction writer, and John Reimringer, novelist, are annual guests on the Bat; their interviews chart their adventures as writers and teachers – and, now, parents. May 2011 Download: audio, small video, or original. June 2012 Download: audio, small video, or original. In this 2012 interview, Katrina talks about her most […]

Michal Hvorecký, Writer, April 2015

Download: audio, small video, or original. Michal Hvorecký, born in 1976, is a writer, translator and director of the library at the Goethe Institute in Bratislava. He has published several books, including Dunaj v Amerike (Danube in America) in 2010, which has been translated to English in collaboration with Profs. Eva Hudecová (U Minnesota – […]

Translating the Danube. Hvorecký, Hudecová, & Lencho, Friday, April 10, 2015

Translating the Danube: A Collaborative Linguistic and Cultural Project Friday, April 10, 2015, 3:30-5:30pm Crosby Seminar Room, 240 Northrop Download: audio, small video, or original. Michal Hvorecký’s Dunaj v Amerike (Danube in America) is a novel about journeys: through European history as well as geography, cultural and interpersonal exchanges, mysteries and personal growth. Its main […]

The Presence of the Past: Memory, Fiction, and the Contemporary Landscape. Thursdays at Four, Oct. 30, 2014

The Presence of the Past: Memory, Fiction, and the Contemporary Landscape October 30, 2014, at 4:00pm Crosby Seminar Room, Northrop Panel with Mary Relindes Ellis, author of The Bohemian Flats (2014), Catherine Watson, memoir and travel writer, and Scott Vreeland, Minneapolis Park Board Commissioner. Download: small video or original. Q&A Download: small video or original. […]

Literary Analysis of World Bank Reports: Franco Moretti, Thursdays at Four, Oct. 2, 2014

The World According to the Bank: an Analysis of World Bank Reports, 1946-2010 October 2, 2014, at 4:00pm Northrop — Crosby Seminar Room Franco Moretti, English, Stanford, gives a semantic, stylistic study of World Bank reports. Download: audio, small video, or original. Q&A Download: audio, small video, or original. Like the post-world-war-II capitalism which it […]

Voices of Northeast Minneapolis, 2014-16

Download: audio, small video, or original. Sarah Stonich is the best-selling author of These Granite Islands, translated into seven languages and shortlisted for France’s Gran Prix de Lectrices de Elle; the critically acclaimed novel The Ice Chorus; and a memoir, Shelter. The founder of WordStalkers.com, she lives in Minneapolis and spends summers in northeastern Minnesota. […]

Thursday, April 10, 2014: Anatoly Liberman on the Origins of Humor

Why People Laugh, or, When Did Laughter Meet the Sense of Humor? The IAS presents Anatoly Liberman, Professor of German, Scandinavian, and Dutch. Download as: audio, podcast video, or original. Q&A Download as: audio, podcast video, or original. Animals don’t laugh. A guffawing cow has reality only on a label for processed cheese. By contrast, […]

Will Weaver, Author, April 6, 2014

Download: audio, small video, or original. Transcript: doc or pdf. Will Weaver‘s debut novel was Red Earth, White Earth, about a native Minnesotan returning to his home town due to conflicts between white farmers and local Native Americans. It was made into a CBS-TV movie in 1989. His 1989 short story collection, A Gravestone Made […]

Emilie Buchwald, Children’s Author, March 7, 2014

Download as: audio, small video, or original. Emilie Buchwald is the author of two award-winning children’s novels, Gildaen and Floramel and Esteban (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, reissued by Milkweed Editions), and under her maiden name of Daisy Bix, the picture books Buddy Unchained and At the Dog Park (The Gryphon Press). A poet and fiction writer, […]

November 15, 2012: Translating Poetry, Or, Versifying with an Accent

Available for download as audio (.mp3 – 58.9 MB) or video (.m4v – 331.1 MB). Question and Answer Session Audio download (.mp3 – 8.3 MB) Video podcast (.m4v – 47.0 MB). Anatoly Liberman is a professor of German, Scandinavian and Dutch at the University of Minnesota. Professor Liberman has published widely across the spectrum of […]

November 13, 2012: Poetry Workshop: The Nature of Industrial Mining Sites – Led by Amir Hussain

Time: 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM Location: 125 Nolte Center for Continuing Education Though published 71 years apart, Muriel Rukeyser’s Book of the Dead (1938) and Mark Nowak’s Coal Mountain Elementary (2009) both use techniques of documentary poetics to convey the human losses of poorly regulated industrial mining practices. Writing about sites where nature meets […]

October 22, 2012: Factory Girl Literature: Sexuality, Violence and Representation in Industrializing Korea

A Presentation by Ruth Barraclough Monday, October 22, 2012,   4:00 PM – 5:30 PM  125 Nolte Center for Continuing Education Korea’s twentieth-century industrialization saw millions of women and girls leave country towns to generate a series of manufacturing booms. Ruth Barraclough will discuss Korean industrial literature to show how the factory girl became an archetypal figure, travelling […]

September 20, 2012: The Uses of History in the Biographical Novel

Roundtable conversation with three prominent writers who have published novels that are also intellectual biographies: Bruce Duffy, author The World As I Found It (which features characters such as Ludwig Wittgenstein, Bertrand Russell, and G.E. Moore); Jay Parini, author of The Last Station (about the last year of Tolstoy’s life) and Lance Olsen (author of Nietzsche’s Kisses). Through the discussion, we […]

Fénelon’s Gods, al-Tahtawi’s Jinn: Trans-Mediterranean Fictionalities

 A talk by Shaden Tageldin Shaden M. Tageldin is associate professor of cultural studies and comparative literature at the University of Minnesota, where she joined the faculty in August 2004. A specialist in nineteenth- and twentieth-century literatures in English, Arabic, and French, her research and teaching engage several fields within a transnational and a translingual […]

Leonard Marcus, February 3, 2012

Leonard Marcus is one of the children’s book world’s most respected and versatile writers, historians, and critics. His highly acclaimed books about children’s literature and the authors and artists who create them include: Golden Legacy: How Golden Books Won Children’s Hearts, Changed Publishing Forever, and Became an American Icon Along the Way; Minders of Make-Believe; Margaret Wise Brown: Awakened […]

The Poem’s Phenomenon – A presentation by Amir Hussain, Tuesday, October 11

Amir Hussain is a graduate student in the Creative Writing Program at the University of Minnesota and a graduate assistant at the Institute for Advanced Study. He maintains a public blog, abundanceandscarcity, that explores issues and events from the Institute’s University Symposium on Abundance & Scarcity. His “Night Poem” and “Hour Poem” appear in Beloit Poetry Journal and Faultline: […]

Shared Cultural Spaces: Islam and the West in the Arts and Sciences

The University of Minnesota’s Program in Religious Studies is pleased to present Shared Cultural Spaces, a conference on Islam and the Humanities. We will explore the ways in which Muslim contributions to literature, arts, science, and architecture have influenced and become foundational to Western humanistic and scientific expressions. Our goal is to draw scholarly and public attention to […]

TEMS Work in progress session – Sovereign Address, Elizabeth Wingrove

In this paper Professor Wingrove considers how writings by “illegitimate” speakers give force and form to contestations over rule, membership, and power; or more generally, how literary practices can comprise a politics. Drawing extensively on archival records, Wingrove reconstructs and explores the case of Geneviève Gravelle, a fantastically prolific letter-writer who died in 1760 at Vincennes prison after 12 years […]

Sexual/Textual Politics in the Chikuho Minefields: Writings by Morisaki Kazue at Circle Village (1958 – 1961)

Speaker: Dr. Brett de Bary, Cornell University Sponsored by: Global Studies, Institute for Advanced Study, Study of the Asias

Leonard Marcus, November 15, 2009

Leonard Marcus is one of the children’s book world’s most respected and versatile writers, historians, and critics. His highly acclaimed books about children’s literature and the authors and artists who create them include: Golden Legacy: How Golden Books Won Children’s Hearts, Changed Publishing Forever, and Became an American Icon Along the Way; Minders of Make-Believe; Margaret Wise Brown: Awakened […]

Simon Gikandi, October 15, 2009

Simon Gikandi is the Robert Schirmer Professor of English at Princeton University. His many books include Reading the African Novel, Reading Chinua Achebe, Writing in Limbo: Modernism and Caribbean Literature, Maps of Englishness: Writing Identity in the Culture of Colonialism, and Ngugi wa Thiong’o. He is currently completing a book on the relation between slavery and the culture of taste. Also […]

Michael Lackey, Faculty Fellow, Spring 2009

Michael Lackey (English, Division of the Humanities, UM-Morris): “Modernist God States: A Literary Study of the Political Scrambles for the World” Lackey completed one chapter of his book, presented two lectures, and completed two essays. One of these, “Sophie‘s Choice and The Remains of the Day: Contesting the Theological Origins of Totalitarianism,” has been recommended for publication at […]

Juliette Cherbuliez, April 2009

Juliette Cherbuliez is a professor of French at the University of Minnesota. Her research is on premodern literature and culture. Within this field, she has a broad range of interests, including: the ethics of violence, women as political subjects, garden architecture and public space, history of the book, and exile. Current projects include: Cosmopolitan Medea, which […]

Rita Raley, March 5, 2009

The interview can also be downloaded as a video podcast (305.1 MB) or as an audio file (.mp3 – 53.9 MB). Rita Raley is a professor of English at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She researches and teaches in the areas of the digital humanities and twentieth-century literature in an “international” or “global” context. Raley’s most recent […]

John Cayley, March 5, 2009

The interview can also be downloaded as a video podcast (301.2 MB) or as an audio file (.mp3 – 53.2 MB). John Cayley has practiced as a poet, translator, publisher, and bookdealer, and all these activities have often intersected with his training in Chinese culture and language. Cayley was the winner of the Electronic Literature Organization’s Award for […]

The Suicide Collectors: A reading with David Oppegaard, February 10, 2009

February 10, 2009IASEvents, Video and Audio0

David Oppegaard reads excerpts from his critically acclaimed novel “the Suicide Collectors”. He also fields questions from the audience.  

Life on the Upper Mississippi – Performance by Patricia Hampl with Dan Chouinard, October 9, 2008

October 9, 2008IASEvents, Video and Audio0

Author Patricia Hampl draws from literary sources far and wide to take listeners on a literary voyage down the Mississippi River. She reads from her own memoirs as well as the work of other poets, novelists, historians and essayists. “Life on the Upper Mississippi: a Literary Excursion” was performed in October at the University of […]

Transitional Justice and Collective Memory, 2008-2009

This research collaborative brings together faculty and graduate students to explore at the University of Minnesota to extend our mutual research interests in the area of transitional justice and collective memory. Since the 1980s, states and non-state actors are increasingly addressing past human rights violations using multiple mechanisms including domestic and international human rights trials, […]

Kao Kalia Yang, April 14, 2008

Hmong Times calls Kao Kalia Yang “one of the best Hmong American writers in the world.” She is a Twin Cities-based writer whose most recent collaboration is the film The Place We Were Born, which documents the experiences of Hmong American refugees, and is the co-founder of Words Wanted, an agency dedicated to helping immigrants […]

John Treat, February 2008

John Treat is a professor of East Asian Languages and Literatures at Yale University, where he specializes in modern Japanese fiction. Among other works, he is the author of Great Mirrors Shattered: Homosexuality, Orientalism, and Japan (1999), Writing Ground Zero: Japanese Literature and the Atomic Bomb (1995), and Pools of Water, Pillars of Fire: The Literature of Ibuse Masuji (1988). The interview […]

“The Je-Ne-Sais-Quoi in Early Modern Europe: Encounters with a Certain Something”: A Discussion with the author, Richard Scholar, November 1

Participants in the TEMS reading group of October 11 will talk with Richard Scholar about the important questions of his new book. In The Je-Ne-Sais-Quoi in Early Modern Europe: Encounters with a Certain Something (Cambridge, 2006), Scholar asks: What is the je-ne-sais-quoi? How – if at all – can it be put into words? In addressing […]

The Poetix Collaborative, 2007-2008

The Poetix Collaborative is dedicated to the cross-cultural study of poetics and poetry and to performing poetic works for campus and non-campus communities alike. Foremost among its multiple aims is to encourage scholarly exchanges on poetics across disciplinary divides and institutions, to make poetry more visible, viable, and embodied, and to establish links with locally, […]

Crossing the Boundaries: Culture, Linguistics, and Literature, 4/14/07

April 14, 2007IASEvents, | Conferences0

This one day event will address the question about the state of the disciplines of Hispanic Studies today and the new challenges that Linguistics and Literature are facing, in particular with regards to the crossing of disciplinary borders such as in Cultural Studies and in the integration of Linguistics and Literature. Invited Panelists: David Castillo, […]

“The Foundation of Rome in Rabbinic Literature: Rome, Constantinople, and the Shifting Geography of Empire”: A talk with Ra’anan Boustan, 2/5/07

February 5, 2007IASEvents0

Professor Boustan analyzes a series of related rabbinic sources that explore the circumstances surrounding the founding of the city of Rome. These sources combine elements of Greek and Latin historiography and mythography with longstanding Jewish historiographic traditions, including earlier models of Jewish history from the apocalyptic literature. The rabbinic tradition thus appropriates such native Roman […]

Reading with Gerald Vizenor: New Native Narratives, Spring 2007

AmIn 4990-002; AmSt 3920-004; EngL 3090-009, 1 credit Tuesdays, 6:20-8:00 p.m.March 19-May 1 4 Scott Hall Instructor: Joseph Bauerkemper. Gerald Vizenor will attend one session. “The books have voices. I hear them in the library,” writes Diane Glancy in Designs of the Night Sky. “I know the voices are from the books. Yet I know the old […]

“Narrating Partition”: A Talk by Sukrita Paul Kumar, 10/18/06

October 18, 2006IASEvents0

Sukrita Paul Kumar is a poet and critic, and she teaches literature at Zakir Husain College, University of Delhi. This event is part of the Fall 2006 South Asia Seminar. Cosponsored by The Department of Asian Languages and Literature, and The Institute for Global Studies.