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Dream of the Red Chamber and women’s literary culture in late imperial China

Dream of the Red Chamber and the evolving shape of women’s literary culture in late imperial China Thursday, April 20, 2017, at 3:30pm Crosby Seminar Room, 240 Northrop Free and open to the public Download: audio, 360p, or 1080p. Chinese women’s literary culture shows considerable evolution between the sixteenth and early twentieth centuries. Communications grow […]

Building the Dream of the Red Chamber. Bright Sheng and David Henry Hwang, November 2015

November 7, 2015IASVideo and Audio0

Download: audio, small video, or original. Composer Bright Sheng and playwright David Henry Hwang discuss their new opera Dream of the Red Chamber with Ann Waltner, Prof. of History at the University of Minnesota.

New Angles on Chinese Film History. August 13-15, 2015

August 13, 2015IASEvents, | Conferences4

New Angles on Chinese Film History An International Conference Open to the public; no registration required. Thursday, August 13 Founder’s Room, Northrop 5:15 Welcoming Remarks: Jason McGrath, University of Minnesota 5:30 Roundtable Discussion: The State and Stakes of Chinese Cinemas Studies Sponsored by the Journal of Chinese Cinemas Chris Berry, King’s College London Yingjin Zhang, […]

Disruption and Containment: Thinking about Tanyangzi in Comparative Perspective. Ann Waltner, History

Disruption and Containment: Thinking about Tanyangzi in Comparative Perspective Tuesday, April 21, 2015, from 4:30-5:45pm 140 Nolte Center The Religious Studies Program Annual Faculty Lecture, by Professor Ann Waltner, History Download: audio, small video, or original. Q&A Download: audio, small video, or original. Religious women are often disruptive: They may violate gender norms by refusing […]

Transnational Genders Onscreen: Critical Asian Studies Collaborative, October 17-18, 2014

Transnational Genders Onscreen: Queer and Feminist Cinema in East and Southeast Asia October 17-18, 2014 35 Nicholson Hall A conference organized by the IAS Critical Asian Studies Collaborative Transnational Genders on Screen: Queer and Feminist Cinema in East and Southeast Asia examines the representation of gender and identity in the films of East and Southeast […]

Monday, May 5, 2014: Sacabuche presents Matteo Ricci: His Map and Music

May 5, 2014IASEvents0

Matteo Ricci: His Map and Music Monday, May 5, 2014, 7:30-9:00pm Northrop — Best Buy Theater $10 Students, $35 General Admission (tickets available here) ¡Sacabuche!, an early music ensemble directed by Linda Pearse, in collaboration with Ann Waltner, use music, words and images to explore the map of the world made by the Italian Jesuit […]

IAS Thursdays Oct 10 2013: Yan Fu Between Tradition and Modernity

Available for download as audio or video. Q&A Available for download as audio or video. Daoism, translation, and science on the cusp of the modern era. Yan Fu (1853-1921) translated important philosophic and scientific texts of Victorian England into refined Classical Chinese, interlacing these modern works with comparisons to ancient Chinese texts.  Thus, Adam Smith, […]

Tues Oct 8: Chinese Students at the University of Minnesota: The First Ten Years (1914 – 1924)

Available for download as audio or video. Question and Answer Session Available for download as audio or video. IAS Director and History Professor Ann Waltner helps the University of Minnesota China Center celebrate 100 years of international exchange. The first Chinese students, Pan Wen Huen, Pan Wen Ping, and Kwong Yih Kum, enrolled at the […]

The Hmong China History Project: Crystal Vang, Choua Xiong, and See Yang, Oct. 2013

Available for download as audio or video. Q&A Available for download as audio or video. Fri. Session 2B: The Hmong China History Project Education and Gender Roles in the Daily Life of the Hmong of China See Yang, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire Analysis of a Hmong Mythical Figure Choua Xiong, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire The […]

Kristian Petersen, Professor of Religion, on Chinese Islam, Sep. 2013

Available for download as audio, podcast video, or original. Kristian Petersen is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Religion at Gustavus Adolphus College. In this interview, he talks about his academic path to studying Islam in China and Sino-Islamic intellectual history. He recalls his early exposure to Daoism and Sufism, their bearing on […]

February 21, 2013: Young women in the ‘Great Divergence’: Textile labor, consumption, and marriage in Europe and China between the mid-17th and the mid-19th centuries

A project presentation by Emily Bruce, Hui-han Jin, Kan Li, M.J. Maynes, Eric Roubinek, and Ann Waltner We focus on ideologies and practices around generational relations, the gendered life-cyclical transition between childhood and adulthood, and the arrangement of marriages or other forms of sexual union. We are interested in girls’ household and non-household labor (especially […]

Early Globalisms in Asia and Africa, a talk by Chapurukha Kusimba, 2/19/13

Postcolonial relationships between Asia and Africa have revived interest in understanding early interactions between the two super continents. African domesticates like millet and sorghum were domesticated in Asia as early as the Shang (Yin) times (ca/ 1600-1027 BCE) while Asian domesticates like banana and rice found their way to Africa similarly early. The continuous occurrence […]

Protected: 2013 Spring Fellows Mingyan Tang

January 20, 2013Aaron Victorin-VangerudFellows,  | Fellows | 2012-2013Enter your password to view comments.

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Kathleen Ryor, November 2012

Kathleen Ryor teaches Chinese art history at Carleton College in Northfield, MN.  In this interview, she talks about her development as an art historian and her work on the Ming dynasty painter Xu Wei.  She talks about several surprising turns her interests have taken, including her recent interest in the connections between the world of […]

A Conversation with Howard Goldblatt, November 27, 2012

Join us for a conversation between acclaimed translator Howard Goldblatt  and Joseph Allen. Professor Goldblatt is best known as the translator of Mo Yan, the 2012 recipient of the Nobel Prize in Literature. Howard Goldblatt was a Research Professor of Chinese at the University of Notre Dame 2002-11 and is a translator of numerous works […]

November 20, 2012: The Chinese Admiral Zheng He: Uses and Abuses of an Historical Figure

Presentation by Geoffrey Wade November 20, 2012: 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM 125 Nolte Center for Continuing Education Geoffrey Wade discusses the celebrated fifteenth-century Chinese eunuch commander Zheng He, whose sea voyages extended through Southeast Asia to East Africa. Professor Wade will explore some of the diverse ways in which Zheng He’s voyages have been […]

A Conversation with the Critical Asian Studies Collaborative, July 30, 2012

Conveners Hiromi Mizuno, Chris Isett, and Travis Workman Hiromi Mizuno talks to Amir Hussain about the collaborative’s mission. The Critical Asian Studies Collaborative, as its name implies, proposes to critically examine both popular conceptions of Asia along with dominant approaches to Asian Studies. The Asia that Westerners typically imagine is the product of a long […]

October 23, 2012: The World in the Year 1000: The View from Beijing

Presentation by Valerie Hansen October 23, 2012: 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM 125 Nolte Center for Continuing Education In the year 1000, the non-Chinese Liao dynasty of the Kitan people ruled Beijing and much of the grasslands spanning Eurasia. They had formal diplomatic relations with many of their immediate neighbors, including Song-dynasty China (960-1276). Commodities from […]

Friday September 28, 2012: Marriage Mobility and Footbinding in Pre-1949 China

September 28, 2012Aaron Victorin-VangerudEventsComments Off on Friday September 28, 2012: Marriage Mobility and Footbinding in Pre-1949 China

Inequality and Methods Workshop at the Minnesota Population Center Friday 9/28 ~ 12:15-1:30 ~ MPC Seminar Room ~ Willey Hall Melissa Brown (Senior Research Associate, MPC) will present her work on marriage mobility and footbinding. Customs controlling girls and women for marriage purposes are generally assumed difficult to change, whether due to cultural meanings about […]

Protected: Wenyi Guo, IAS Fellow 2012-2013

August 15, 2012Aaron Victorin-VangerudFellows,  | Fellows | 2012-2013Enter your password to view comments.

There is no excerpt because this is a protected post.

The Stone of Hope – Lei Yixin, Master Sculptor of the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial

Lei Yixin, Master Sculptor of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial on the National Mall in Washington DC, will reveal the story of his latest masterpiece, the Stone of Hope and Mountain of Despair. The fascinating story involving friendship and work between American and Chinese people was fraught with controversy and challenge. Lei Yixin is […]

What Yaogun (Chinese Rock) Can Teach Rock & Roll – A talk by Jonathan Campbell, April 20, 2012

Available for download as audio (.mp3 – 45.0 MB) or video (.m4v – 255.2 MB). Question and Answer Session Available for download as audio (.mp3 – 45.0 MB) or video (.m4v – 255.2 MB). Jonathan Campbell graduated from Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick, in 1998 and received a Master’s in International Studies from the Jackson […]

Michelle Dammon Loyalka, April 16, 2012

Every year over 200 million peasants flock to China’s urban centers, providing a profusion of cheap labor that helps fuel the country’s staggering economic growth. Award-winning journalist Michelle Dammon Loyalka discusses her new book, in which she follows the trials and triumphs of eight such migrants–including a vegetable vendor, an itinerant knife sharpener, a free-spirited recycler, and […]

Eating Bitterness: Stories from the Front Lines of China’s Great Urban Migration

A book talk with award-winning journalist Michelle Dammon Loyalka Every year over 200 million peasants flock to China’s urban centers, providing a profusion of cheap labor that helps fuel the country’s staggering economic growth. Award-winning journalist Michelle Dammon Loyalka discusses her new book, in which she follows the trials and triumphs of eight such migrants–including […]

Oxhide II (2009, 132 min., directed by Liu Jiayin)

Oxhide II (2009, 132 min., directed by Liu Jiayin) With nine shots in a small apartment, director Liu Jiayin cast herself and her parents in a meditative and experimental snapshot of domestic life and daily rituals in China. The heart of the film is the simple yet engrossing routine of making dumplings. Liu masked her […]

The Fortune Teller (2010, 129 min., directed by Xu Tong)

Armed with an HD camera, Xu Tong takes a long look at Li Baicheng, a traditional Chinese fortune teller, and his wife Pearl Shi, two people left behind in China’s dramatic push towards capitalism. A riveting portrait of life on the fringes, this brave documentary achieves a rare intimacy with its subjects that is both […]

Communication and Cooperation in Early Imperial China

Presentation by Charles Sanft Government in early imperial China, especially under the famous First Emperor of Qin, is often viewed as totalitarian and cruel. At the same time, many ancient political philosophers argued for essentially non-coercive government. Charles Sanft employs interdisciplinary theory to suggest that cooperation played a large role in Qin governance, and that […]

Choreographer Jin Xing in Conversation with Ananya Chatterjea and Ben Johnson

China’s most celebrated dancer, Jin Xing, and her company Jin Xing Dance Theatre Shanghai, will perform at the Orpheum Theatre as part of Northrop Dance on February 18. Jin Xing’s courage, fighting spirit, and beautiful artistry have contributed to her great success as a dancer and owner of China’s only independent dance company. Her choreography […]

Shan Shui, Ren Qing: Re-envisioning Chinese Cities with Eastern Genius Loci

Shan Shui, Ren Qing: Re-envisioning Chinese Cities with Eastern Genius Loci A presentation by Weiming Lu Download: audio, small video or original. Q&A Download: audio, small video or original. Chinese cities have been undergoing rapid changes. Historic fabrics are fast disappearing. New additions tend to be poor transplants from somewhere else, bearing no relationship to […]

China’s Green Revolution and African Agricultural Development. William Moseley, October 14, 2011

China’s Green Revolution and African Agricultural Development: Dis-Oriented Histories and Misapplied Lessons Download: audio, small video, or original. Q&A Download: audio, small video, or original. William Moseley is a professor in the Department of Geography at Macalester College where he teaches about and researches political ecology, tropical agriculture, environment and development policy, and livelihood security. […]

Kirill Thompson, September 15, 2011

Kirill Thompson is Associate Dean at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Professor in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literature at National Taiwan University. He is a specialist in Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism, Zhu Xi, in particular, but also investigates pre-Qin thought and other developments. His interests include Western philosophy as […]

Humanist Impulses in Traditional Chinese Thought – A presentation by Kirill Thompson, September 15, 2011

September 15, 2011IASEvents, Video and Audio0

Two perceived weaknesses of humanist thought, at least as it has come down to us in the Anglo-American tradition are its individualist predilection and species centrism. In the present talk, Kirill Thompson contends, to summarize roughly, that Confucius established a humanistic ethic based on a relational notion of self, that Mozi broke through the inherent […]

China Insights—Unsettling Consequences: A Conversation with Thomas Rose and Joseph Allen, September 15, 2011

Joseph Allen is a professor of Asian Languages and Literatures at the University of Minnesota. His research specialties include a focus on Chinese poetry and poetics, contemporary uses of the past, and colonialist photography. Thomas Rose is a sculptor and a professor of Art at the University of Minnesota. His work is particularly interested in the […]

Thomas Rose, August 4, 2011

Thomas Rose is a sculptor and a professor of Art at the University of Minnesota. Prof. Rose’s work is particularly interested in the intersections of architecture and memory. Many of his projects over the last five years have led to exhibitions in China, and information about his numerous exhibitions and publications can be found on his […]

Annual Meeting of the Society for Seventeenth-Century Music: Matteo Ricci—His Map and Music

Annual Meeting of the Society for Seventeenth-Century Music: Matteo Ricci—His Map and Music. A performance by ¡Sacabuche! (Linda Pearse, Artistic Director) and Ann Waltner Co-sponsored by the Institute for Advanced Study, Early Modern History, US China Peoples Friendship Association, and the School of Music.

Angel Island: Immigrant Gateway to America

October 27, 2010IASEvents0

Book launch of: Angel Island:  Immigrant Gateway to America by Erika Lee and Judy Yung Oxford University Press, August 2010 A gripping portrait of the “Ellis Island of the West,” highlighting the Immigration stories that made Angel Island a place of heartbreak as well as hope From 1910 to 1940, over half a million people […]

“Transparent Shanghai”: A Presentation by Weihong Bao

September 23, 2010IASEvents, Quadrant0

“Transparent Shanghai”: Cityscape, Vertical Montage, and a Left-wing Culture of Glass – Presentation by Weihong Bao This talk considers the dynamic interaction between Chinese architectural discourses and cinematic reflections in the mid 1930s evolving around a “culture of glass,” closely affiliated with international modernist architecture and a commodity culture of display. Weihong Bao will pursue how architectural and cinematic discourses, produced in […]

Bat of Minerva, Ann Waltner, May 2006 & August 2010

Ann Waltner is a professor in both the Department of History and the Department of Asian Languages and Literatures and is former founding director of the IAS. Her research interests lie in the social history of sixteenth and seventeenth century China, comparative women’s history, and world history. She recently finished a term as editor of […]

Ted Farmer, May 2010

Ted Farmer is a professor of History at the University in Minnesota, where he serves as the editor of Ming Studies and his teaching and research interests focus on examining global and world history from a perspective that resists Eurocentric assumptions.  He was trained in East Asian Regional Studies and Modern Chinese history. My research has concentrated on the […]

Amy Howard, February 11, 2010

Amy Howard is a professor of American Studies at the University of Richmond where she also directs the Bonner Center for Civic Engagement. Prof. Howard will explore the history of the Ping Yuen public housing project in San Francisco’s Chinatown. Ping Yuen’s location, faux Chinese architectural design, and tenant population of Chinese Americans defy the […]