University of Minnesota
University of Minnesota
http://www.umn.edu/
612-625-5000

Fellows Spring 2014
Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) residential fellows comprise faculty, graduate students, and outside scholars who spend a semester or year in residence at the IAS.  Together they constitute a supportive interdisciplinary intellectual community in which fellows work intensively on their own research and creative projects and meet regularly to discuss their work and exchange ideas.

Fellows in Residence

Each year up to twelve University of Minnesota faculty members are selected as Residential Fellows. Fellows are released from all teaching obligations during the tenure of their fellowships and are in residence at our offices in Northrop, where they can benefit from the community of scholars and share their work across disciplines.

In addition to faculty fellows, from 2008 through 2013 the IAS hosted Quadrant residential fellowships supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation in conjunction with the University of Minnesota Press and, from 2009 to 2011, Henry Luce Foundation Hmong Studies Fellows. The IAS also is the home of recipients of the Graduate School’s Interdisciplinary Doctoral Fellowship. These graduate fellows are pursuing interdisciplinary projects and are in residence for the entire academic year.

Application process

Applications for Residential Faculty Fellowships at the IAS are due on Friday, October 17, 2014. The link to the application system will be posted in mid-September. More information can be found on the applications page.

Information on applications for Interdisciplinary Doctoral Fellowships at the IAS will be posted soon. More information can be found on the applications page.

Please join us in welcoming our Fall 2014 and Spring 2015 fellows.

Residential Fellows 2013-14

Faculty Fellows Fall 2013

M. Bianet Castellanos
Department of American Studies, College of Liberal Arts, Twin Cities
“The Politics of Housing, Debt, and Urbanization in Cancún, Mexico”
M. Bianet Castellanos and the IAS
Carl Elliott, Jr.
Center for Bioethics, Academic Health Center
“The Business of Clinical Research”
Carl Elliott, Jr. and the IAS
Richard J Graff
Department of Writing Studies
“Greek Rhetoric in Situ: Digitally Reconstructing Ancient Sites of Oratorical performance”
Richard Graff and the IAS
Matthew Rahaim
School of Music,  College of Liberal Arts, Twin Cities
“Voice Cultures: Ethical Power and Vocal Techniques in South Asia”
Matthew Rahaim and the IAS

Faculty Fellows Spring 2014

Qiang Fang
Department of History, College of Liberal Arts, Duluth
“Revolutionary Judiciaries: The Making of the People’s Courts in the Early People’s Republic of China (1949-1958)”

Jill Hasday
Law School
“Intimate Lies: Fraud in the Family”

Karen Ho
Department of Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts, Twin Cities
“When Work and Society Mimic Hedge Funds: Tracing Financial Risk Through Corporations and Investments ”
Karen Ho and the IAS

Patricia Lorcin 
Department of History, College of Liberal Arts, Twin Cities
The Cold War, Art and Politics in the transnational activism of Gloria de Herrera
Patricia Lorcin and the IAS

Lorena Muñoz 
Department of Geography, College of Liberal Arts, Twin Cities
“Queer, Brown and (In)Visible: Production, Consumption, and Performance of Immigrant Latina/o Vending Street-Scapes in Los Angeles”

Tisha Turk
English Discipline, Division of the Humanities, Morris
“Fan Vids and the Rhetoric of Music”

Interdisciplinary Doctoral Graduate Fellows 2013-14

Lars Christensen
School of Music,  College of Liberal Arts, Twin Cities
“Song Dynasty Musical Thought and the Development of Early Modern China”

Emily Fedoruk
Cultural Studies & Comparative Literature,  College of Liberal Arts, Twin Cities
“To Scale/For Sale: Gentrification and the Poetic Commodity”

François-Nicolas Vozel
Department of French and Italian, College of Liberal Arts, Twin Cities
“Facing the Music: Literature, Music, and Corporeal Writing”

Demetri Debe
Department of History, College of Liberal Arts, Twin Cities
“Necessary Connections: Building Black Mobility in the Public Markets of the Circum-Caribbean, 1660-1815″

Anaïs Nony
Department of French and Italian, College of Liberal Arts, Twin Cities
“New Screen Practices After the Digital Divide: Film, Performance, and Screen Arts”

Visiting Fellows

Yasmeen Arif, Fulbright
Sociology, Delhi School of Economics, University of Delhi
“Afterlife: Reconstituting the Damaged Social”

Mingyan Tang
Philosophy, Dalian University of Technology
“The Relationship between Passion and Rites”
Mingyan Tang and the IAS

Emily Johnson, Doris Duke Residency
Artist
“Shore”
Emily Johnson and the IAS

Residential Fellows 2012-13

Fall 2012

David Chang 
Department of History, College of Liberal Arts
“A World of Power: Native Hawaiians and the Politics of Global Geography in the Nineteenth Century”

Nancy Cook 
Law School, Director of the Lawyering Program
“The Witness Project”

William McGeveran 
Law School
“Self and Selves: Public and Private Regulation of Online Identification”

John Nichols
Department of American Indian Studies, Program in Linguistics, Department of American Studies, College of Liberal Arts
“Algonquian Digital Text Editions”

Frances Vavrus 
Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development, College of Education and Human Development
“Poverty Lessons: Education and Economic Development in Africa in a Neoliberal Age”

Shannon Walsh 
Department of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts, University of Minnesota – Duluth
“Engendering State Institutions: State Response to Violence Against Women in Latin America”

Spring 2013

Faculty Fellows Spring 2013

Michael Gaudio 
Department of Art History, College of Liberal Arts
“”Prosper Thou Our Handyworks:” Prints and Protestant Devotion at Little Gidding, 1625-1642″

David Pellow 
Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts
“Social Movements and the Quest for Total Liberation”

Kathy Quick 
Public and Nonprofit Management and Leadership, Humphrey School of Public Affairs
“Intersections of Bioecological and Institutional Paradigms for Practicing Resilience: An Investigation of Collaborative Environmental and Community Stewardship”

Ray Schultz 
Department of Theatre, Humanities Division, University of Minnesota – Morris
Solo Performance Project: “It Could Be Worse: The Mayo, Mutant Genes, Cancer, and Me”

Shaden Tageldin 
Department of Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature, College of Liberal Arts
“Toward a Transcontinental Theory of Modern Comparative Literature”

Quadrant

Graduate Fellows

Residential Fellows 2011-12

Fall 2011

IAS Faculty Fellows, Fall 2011
Jill Doerfler
Department of American Indian Studies
College of Liberal Arts, University of Minnesota – Duluth
“Blood v Family: The Struggle Over Identity and Tribal Citizenship among the White Earth Anishinaabeg”

 

Amy Kaminsky 
Department of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies
College of Liberal Arts
“Planting Wheat and Reaping Doctors: Jews, Gender, and Modernity in Argentina”

 

Christine Marran
Department of Asian Languages and Literatures
College of Liberal Arts
“Unbecoming Nation: Ecological Alliances in Japanese Poetics and Film”

 

J.B. Mayo
Department of Curriculum & Instruction
College of Education and Human Development
“The Impact of Two Spirit Individuals on Minnesota’s Ojibwe Nation: Cultural Revitalization, Gender Expression, and Social Studies Curriculum”

 

Rachel Schurman
Department of Sociology and the Institute for Global Studies
College of Liberal Arts
“”Science for the Poor”: The Political Economy and Cultural Politics of the New Humanitarian Agriculture”

 

Joseph Staats
Department of Political Science
College of Liberal Arts
University of Minnesota – Duluth
“Allies and Adversaries in the Battle to Improve Judicial Performance: Women’s Rights Organizations and the Courts in Seven Former Communist Countries in Central and Eastern Europe”

Spring 2012

Cawo Abdi 
Department of Sociology
College of Liberal Arts
“Divergent Migrations? Somali Experiences in South Africa, America, and the United Arab Emirates”

 

Tracey Deutsch
Department of History
College of Liberal Arts
“The Julia Child Project”

 

Gregory Donofrio
School of Architecture
College of Design
“‘The Container and the Contained’: The Functional Preservation of Historic Food Markets”

 

Jessica Larson
Department of Studio Art
Humanities Division
University of Minnesota – Morris
“Primer for a Young Feminist”

 

Jennifer Rothchild
Department of Sociology
Humanities Division
University of Minnesota – Morris
“Boys in the Kitchen and Girls in the Yard: Social Constructions of Gender and Family in Nepali Orphanages”

 

David Samuels 
Department of Political Science
College of Liberal Arts
“Inequality and Democratization: A Contractarian Approach”

Visiting Fellows

Brian Horrigan
Minnesota Historical Society
NEH Fellowship recipient
“Charles Lindbergh and Twentieth-Century American Culture”

 

Charles Sanft
Institute for Sinology and East Asian Studies
University of Muenster
“Communication and Cooperation in Early Imperial China”

Quadrant

Adia Benton is a medical anthropologist and visiting assistant professor in the anthropology department at Oberlin College. She received her PhD in social (medical) anthropology at Harvard University. Her research has focused on HIV treatment, care and support efforts in  Freetown, Sierra Leone, examining how HIV treatment, care, and support in a low-prevalence, post-conflict setting reflects, engenders and reproduces novel forms of “exception”– in terms of subjectivities, professional practice, and in knowledge production within, about, and for Africa. Dr. Benton was in residence in fall 2011 with the Health & Society Quadrant.

Luis Castañeda earned his PhD in art and architectural history from NYU’s Institute of Fine Arts in 2011, with a dissertation that examined the intersections between politics and design in the context of the 1968 Mexico City Olympics. His work examines the relationship between international relations, the negotiation of cultural identities, and the transformations in design culture of twentieth-century Latin America. He began a position as an assistant professor in art and music histories at Syracuse University in fall 2011. Professor Castañeda was in residence in spring 2012 with the Design, Architecture, and Culture Quadrant.

Marcus Filippello is a visiting assistant professor in history at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He received his doctorate in African history from the University of California-Davis in 2010. His project, “Crossing the ‘Black Earth’: Environmental Change, Eco-Nationalism, and Post-Independence Autonomy in a Beninese Forest Community,” is based on his dissertation. The manuscript analyzes the textual nature of a road traversing a valley of seasonal wetlands to emphasize social and environmental change in southeastern Benin, West Africa. Professor Filippello was in residence in fall 2011 with the Environment, Culture, and Sustainability Quadrant.

Graduate Fellows

Namrata Gaikwad
Interdisciplinary Doctoral Fellow
Department of Anthropology
“Men Against Matrilineage: Contestations Around Gender Politics in Shillong, India”
Mentors: Simona Sawhney, Asian Language and Literatures; Ajay Skaria, History/Global Studies

I-Chun Catherine Chang
Department of Geography
“Chinese Green Capitalism and Urban Sustainability: Cases of Shanghai’s Dongtan Eco-City and Tainjin’s Eco-City”
Mentor: Michael Goldman

Anna Rosensweig (Fall 2011)
Department of French and Italian
“Relational Rights and Theaters of Mourning in Seventeenth-Century France”
Mentor: Nancy Luxon

Kari Smalkoski (Spring 2012)
Department of Family Social Science
“Performing Masculinities: The Impact of Cultural Practices, Racialization and Space on Hmong Male Youth and their Families”
Mentor: Diyah Larasati

 

Laura Wertheim (Fall 2011)
Department of Art History
“Playing House: Feminine Elusiveness and Fantasy in Contemporary Art Making”
Mentor: Tracey Deutsch

Residential Fellows 2010-11

Fall 2010

Susanna Ferlito
Department of French and Italian
College of Liberal Arts
“Patient’s Voices: Notes Towards a History of Sensibilities in Medical Languages”

 

Tasoulla Hadjiyanni
Department of Design, Housing, and Apparel
College of Design
“Meaning-making and Practice: How Culture and Design Relate under Conditions of Displacement”

 

David Karjanen
Department of American Studies
College of Liberal Arts
“Spectral Economies: Violence, Marginality, and the Transformation of Global Capitalism”

 

Erika Lee
Departments of History and Asian American Studies
College of Liberal Arts
“The ‘Yellow Peril’ in the Americas: A Transnational History of Migration and Race, 1850-1945″

 

Michelle Mason
Department of Philosophy
College of Liberal Arts
“Evaluating Persons”

 

Lisa Sun-Hee Park
Department of Sociology
College of Liberal Arts
“The Case of the Missing Mountains: Environmental Privilege, Immigration, and the Politics of Place”

 

Simona Sawhney
Department of Asian Languages and Literatures
College of Liberal Arts
“War and the Subject of Politics: Postcolonial Questions”

Spring 2011

Bruce Braun
Department of Geography
College of Liberal Arts
“Machine Ecologies: Posthumanism and the City”

 

Joseph Gerteis
Department of Sociology
College of Liberal Arts
“American Nationalism: Boundaries and Identities in Historical Context”

 

Mary Hermes
Department of Education
College of Education and Human Service Professions
University of Minnesota – Duluth
“Community and Collaboration: Ojibwe Language Documentation and Revitalization”

Bernadette Longo
Department of Writing Studies
College of Liberal Arts
“Risk: The Democratic Republic of Congo Edition”

 

Dara Strolovitch
Department of Political Science
College of Liberal Arts
“When Bad Things Happen to Privileged People”

 

Thomas Wolfe
Department of History
College of Liberal Arts
“Subjectivity, Selfhood, and European Integration”

Quadrant

Jeremy Bryson received his Ph.D. from the Department of Geography at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University, where his dissertation project is titled “The Nature of Gentrification.” His research interests focus on the historical and contemporary urban environments of the American Northwest, particularly the cities of Spokane, Washington and Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. Bryson was in residence during the fall semester with the Environment, Culture, and Sustainability Quadrant.

Shiloh Krupar is a professor in the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University where she is currently at work on a project entitled “Hot Spotter’s Manifesto: Practicing a Transnatural Ethics.” Her research interests focus on the emergent museums and curatorial practices of postsocialist urban China and the politics of nature conservation and environmental memory at decommissioned military sites and nuclear facilities in the U.S. West. Krupar also works collaboratively on a project entitled Museum of Waste, which explores the intersection of ecologies of waste, security, and affect, and a co-edited journal issue on “The Body in Breast Cancer.” Prof. Krupar was a fellow with the Environment, Culture, and Sustainability andHealth and Society groups of Quadrant in the fall of 2010.

Matthew Wolf-Meyer is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He received his Ph.D. from the Department of Anthropology at the University of Minnesota, specializing in medical anthropology and the social study of science and technology. He is currently working on a book manuscript based upon his dissertation researchThe Slumbering Masses: Integral Medicine and the Production of American Everyday Life (University of Minnesota Press, forthcoming). Prof. Wolf-Meyer was in residence at the IAS during fall semester with the Health and Society group of Quadrant.

Hmong Studies

The Program in Asian American Studies and the Institute for Advanced Study at the University of Minnesota are hosting both a postdoctoral and a graduate fellow in Hmong Studies, generously funded by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation. Hmong Studies fellows at the IAS are full members of the intellectual community of the IAS. They are given an office with computer in the Nolte Center, participate in weekly lunches with residential faculty fellows and visiting fellows, and make an informal presentation of their work in progress to other IAS fellows once each semester. The fellows are expected to be in residence at the Nolte Center for their year of fellowship and to participate actively in IAS programs.

The full press release for the Luce Foundation grant can be found here.

Her Vang received his Ph.D in U.S. History from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities in 2010. His dissertation, “Dreaming of Home, Dreaming of Land: Hmong Displacements and Transnational Politics” is based on ethnographic fieldwork and archival research done in Laos, Thailand, and the United States between 2006 and 2009. His work explores the evolution of Hmong transnational politics in Thailand and the United States after the Vietnam War. It analyzes the intertwined relation between Hmong ethnic and transnational politics, the impact of global and regional politics on Hmong transnational politics, and the role of the Hmong diaspora in the conflict in the homeland. During the fellowship year, he will be researching the role of nostalgia (the longing for home and the “golden” past) and memory of the war on the rise of Hmong transnational politics in the United States.

During the 2009-2010 academic year, Dr. Vang was the Visiting Instructor in Hmong American Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He taught “Hmong Politics in Global Context” in the Spring of 2011.

Kari Smalkoski studies recently arrived Hmong from Wat Tham Krabok who are attending suburban schools through a “choice” program. She seeks to understand the layers of multiplicity within the Hmong community by examining the ways in which Hmong male masculinities and popular cultural practices impact their non-school and school identities while interrogating the racialized and classed aspects of gender. She argues that unpacking these identities is of vital importance as they influence the multiple and often complicated ways that students understand and “do school” in their lives.

Graduate Fellows

Greta Bliss
Department of French and Italian
“Untranslating the Maghreb: Reckoning with Gender in Literature and Film from Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia”
Mentor: J. B. Shank, Department of History

 

Eric Colleary
Department of Theatre Arts and Dance
“Beyond the Closet: Identities and Histories in LGBT Archives in the United States”
Mentor: Regina Kunzel, Department of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies

 

Adair Rounthwaite
Department of Art History
“Vulnerable Spaces: Martha Rosler and Group Material at DIA Arts 1988-89”
Mentor: Margaret Werry, Department of Theatre Arts and Dance

 

Daniel Winchester
Department of Sociology
“Between East and West: The Process and Politics of Conversion to Eastern Orthodoxy in the U.S.”
Mentor: Jeanne Kilde, Program in Religious Studies

Residential Fellows 2009-10

Fall 2009

Ritu Bhatt
School of Architecture
College of Design
“Everyday Aesthetics and Cognition: An Exploration of Tibetan Buddhist Spatial Practices”

 

Teresa Gowan
Department of Sociology
College of Liberal Arts
“Between the ‘Higher Power’ and ‘Personal Responsibility’: Addiction Treatment and Neoliberal Policy Management”

 

Jean Langford
Department of Anthropology
College of Liberal Arts
“Critical Spirits: Violence, Medicine, and Mourning in Emigrant Stories of Death”

 

Nancy Luxon
Department of Political Science
College of Liberal Arts
“Truth-Telling, Authority, and Political Representation”

 

Mark Pedelty
School of Journalism and Mass Communication
College of Liberal Arts
“Global Media?: A Comparative Analysis of Journalistic Subjectivity in Environmental Reporting”

 

Jenny Schmid
Department of Art
College of Liberal Arts
“The Animated Body and Gender Liberation”

 

Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark
Department of American Indian Studies
College of Liberal Arts
University of Minnesota – Duluth
“Stealing Fire, Scattering Ashes: Anishinaabe Expressions of Sovereignty, Nationhood, and Land Tenure in Treaty Making with the United States and Canada, 1785-1923”

Spring 2010

Penny Edgell
Department of Sociology
College of Liberal Arts
“Beyond the Culture Wars: How Ordinary Citizens Use Religious, Legal, and Scientific Repertoires to Understand Contemporary Social Dilemmas”

 

Cindy Garcia
Department of Theatre Arts and Dance
College of Liberal Arts
“Un/Sequined Corporealities and the Deterritorialization of Salsa: Gendered Performances of Latinidad in Los Angeles Salsa Economies”

 

Kathleen Hull
Department of Sociology
College of Liberal Arts
“Beyond the Culture Wars: How Ordinary Citizens Use Religious, Legal, and Scientific Repertoires to Understand Contemporary Social Dilemmas”

 

Stuart McLean
Department of Anthropology
College of Liberal Arts
“A Poetics of Emergence: Imagining Creativity beyond ‘Nature’ and ‘Culture’”

 

Yuichiro Onishi
Department of African American & African Studies
College of Liberal Arts
“Occupied Okinawa on the Edge of Law”

 

Omise’eke Natasha Tinsley
Department of English
College of Liberal Arts
“Water, Shoulders, Into the Black Pacific”

 

Diane Willow
Department of Art
College of Liberal Arts
“Body Electric”

Quadrant

Klaus Høyer will be in residence in spring semester with the Health and Society Quadrant, working on the project “Ex-changing the Human Body.” The existing literature on human tissue exchanges tends to focus on commodification of the “body” through “market” exchange as if everybody agreed on the meaning of these words. Prof. Høyer emphasizes the moral agency involved in setting up such exchanges, and points to new and hitherto unexplored aspects of tissue exchanges, in particular in relation to the ways in which money changes hands and tissue interacts with new understandings of the body. Prof. Høyer is in the department of Health Services Research at the University of Copenhagen.

Matt Huber is in residence fall semester with the Environment, Culture, and Sustainability Quadrant, working on the project “Energizing Neoliberalism: Oil and the Cultural Politics of Price.” Building off his doctoral work that covered the period from 1930 to 1972, he examines the oil price “shocks” of the 1970s and the shifting cultural politics of oil prices over the last three decades. Specifically, he is interested in understanding the relationship between neoliberalization and the increasing role of financial markets in oil price formation. Dr. Huber received his PhD in Geography from Clark University in 2009.

Reecia Orzeck will be in residence in spring semester with the Global Cultures Quadrant. In her project, “On International Law: A Political-Economic Critique,” Professor Orzeck argues that, while the United States left has spent much of the last eight years defending the institutions and principles associated with public international law, its use and defense of that law must be accompanied by an investigation of it. This project critically reconstructs international law in order to uncover, first, the nature of international law’s relationship to imperialism, and second, the means by which this relationship remains mystified. Professor Orzeck is in the Department of Geography at the University of Vermont.

Kelly Quinn will be in residence in spring semester with the Design, Architecture, and Culture Quadrant, , working on “Hilyard R. Robinson: Modern Architecture and Professional Place-making.” This project is a biography of an African-American architect whose work includes a modern housing program built by and for African Americans in the District of Columbia during the early part of the 20th century. Prof. Quinn is in the American studies department at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.

Lisa Uddin is in residence fall semester with theEnvironment, Culture, and Sustainability Quadrant, working on the project “Breeding Grounds: Race and Renewal in American Zoos.” Her project examines the turn to environmentalist animal displays in American zoos of the 1960s and 70s as channels for the revitalization of white public culture in U.S. urban regions. In these decades, amidst maturing discourse of urban decay that pathologized a black underclass, middle-class Americans of myriad ethnic backgrounds made use of imagined and built environments to help fashion themselves as racially white. Prof. Uddin received her PhD in Visual and Cultural Studies from the University of Rochester.

Hmong Studies

The Program in Asian American Studies and the Institute for Advanced Study at the University of Minnesota are hosting both a postdoctoral and a graduate fellow in Hmong Studies, generously funded by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

The full press release can be found here.

Leena Neng Her received her PhD in Educational Linguistics from Stanford University in 2009. Her project, “Educational Opportunity, Minority Status, and Discursive Practices in the Hmong Diaspora,” combines research conducted in Laos and in the United States in which she pursues structural constraints such as minority status, the institution of schooling, and American and Lao culture as central frames to interpret social phenomena. Her work follows the ethnography of how one school community in the US explained minority academic failure, identify educational problems and consequently propose solutions and compares it to similar discourse about Hmong student experiences in Laos and access to higher education.

In the Spring of 2010, Dr. Her is teaching Ethnic Minorities, Schooling, & Scientific Theory.

Giac-Thao (Alisia) Tran is a PhD candidate in Psychology at the University of Minnesota. Her project, “Leaving out Hmong – What do we really leave out?” explores parental racial/ethnic socialization as a protective factor against discrimination in Hmong families. Her research shows that different types of socialization strategies are associated with positive and negative youth and family outcomes, rendering it even more important to uncover the complex interrelations between sociocultural contexts, family practices, and youth outcomes.

Graduate Fellows

Yu-Ju Chien
Sociology
“Constructing Scientific Knowledge and Policies on Avian Influenza: International Organizations and Global Authoritative Knowledge”

 

Cerise Myers
Art History
“The Visible Posthuman: Envisioning Agency for the Cybernetic Self in Digital Culture”

 

Juliana Hu Pegues
American Studies
“Rethinking Relations: The Interracial Intimacies of Asian America”

Residential Fellows 2008-09

Fall 2008

Elizabeth Boyle
Department of Sociology
College of Liberal Arts
“Child Rights, Economic Neoliberalism, and Children’s Well-Being”

 

Giancarlo Casale
Department of History
College of Liberal Arts
“Curiosity and Intolerance in Muslim-Christian Relations: The Ottoman Case”

 

Michael Goldman
Department of Sociology
College of Liberal Arts
“Inside the ‘Bangalore Model’ of World-City Making: Excitement and Dispossession in Asia’s Newest World Cities”

 

Jennifer Gunn
Program in the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine
Medical School
“Plains Practice: Rural Health and Medicine in the Upper Midwest, 1900-1950″

 

Hiromi Mizuno
Department of History
College of Liberal Arts
“The Politics of Belonging: The History of Population Policy in Postwar Japan”

 

Ajay Skaria
Department of History/Institute for Global Studies
College of Liberal Arts
“Immeasurable Equality: Gandhi and the Politics of Satyagraha”

 

Charles Sugnet
Department of English
College of Liberal Arts
“Locomotion and Time in West African Cinema”

 

Leslie Van Duzer
School of Architecture
College of Design
“The Art of Deception”

 

Margaret Werry
Department of Theatre Arts and Dance
College of Liberal Arts
“Traveling the Virtual Pacific: Political Theatre and Theatrical Politics”

Spring 2009

Joan DeJaeghere
Department of Educational Policy and Administration
College of Education and Human Development
“Mexican Immigrant Youth Experiences of Citizenship in Local, National, and Transnational Contexts”

 

Mitra C. Emad
Department of Sociology & Anthropology
College of Liberal Arts, UM Duluth
“Reaching the Body: Birth and Death as Sites for Knowledge-in-Action in Health Care Professionalization”

 

Kale Fajardo
Department of American Studies
College of Liberal Arts
“Islands, Cities, and Salas: Trans-local Queer Filipino/a Imaginaries, Cultural Productions, and Activism”

 

Michael Lackey
English Discipline
Division of the Humanities
University of Minnesota – Morris
“Modernist God States: A Literary Study of the Political Scrambles for the World”

 

Rachmi (Diyah) Larasati
Department of Theatre Arts and Dance
College of Liberal Arts
“Global Corporeality in Post Conflict/War Zone”

 

Jani Scandura
Department of English
College of Liberal Arts
“Suitcase: Fragments on Memory and Motion”

 

Karen-Sue Taussig
Department of Anthropology/Medical School
College of Liberal Arts/Academic Health Center
“Science, Subjectivity, and Citizenship”

Quadrant

Yasmeen Arif was in residence in the spring semester with the Global Cultures Group to work on her project, “Afterlife: Recovering Life After Catastrophe.” Dr. Arif was at the University of Minnesota last year as a Sawyer Post-doctoral Fellow on Humanitarianisms and World Orders and as a visiting lecturer in the Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Global Change. She received her Ph.D. in sociology from the Delhi School of Economics at the University of Delhi, India.

Guillaume Boccara joined the Global Cultures Group in the spring; his project is called “The Making of Indigenous Culture: Neoliberal Multiculturalism and Ethnogovernmentality in Post- Dictatorship Chile.” Dr. Boccara received his Ph.D. in anthropology from the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris, where he is a researcher at the Centre national de la recherche scientifique. He is also a professor at the Instituto de Investigaciones Arqueológica y Museo at the Northern Catholic University in Chile.

 


Arijit Sen
 was a fellow in the Design, Architecture, and Culture Group in the fall, and will be developing his project, “Mobile Bodies, Transgressing Selves: Politics of Place and South Asian Identity, 1900-2000.” Dr. Sen received his Ph.D. in architecture from the University of California, Berkeley, and is an assistant professor of architecture at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.

Graduate Fellows

Ozan Karaman
Department of Geography
College of Liberal Arts
“Building a ‘world city’: Urban entrepreneurialism and the politics of segregation in Istanbul”

 

Tim O’Brien
School of Music
College of Liberal Arts
“Women, Furniture and Ornaments: Commodification and Redistribution of Female Muslim Slave Musicians in Medieval Al-Andalus”

 

Thomas Walton
Department of Anthropology
College of Liberal Arts
“Mental Health and Modernity in Post-Colonial Papua New Guinea”

Residential Fellows 2007-08

Fall 2007

Stuart Albert
Department of Strategic Management and Organization
Carlson School of Management
“Principles of Timing”

 

Kenneth Mark Anderson
Department of Asian Languages and Literatures
College of Liberal Arts
“Imperial Difference: Japan and the State of Exception in the Pacific”

 

Dan L. Burk
Law School
“True Names: Ownership and Control of Knowledge Representation”

 

David Chang
Department of History
College of Liberal Arts
“Hawaiian Global Geographies in the Age of High Imperialism”

 

Michael Eble
Department of Studio Art
Humanities Division
University of Minnesota – Morris
“Washed Away: Observations on Louisiana Coastal Erosion and its Implications on Cajun Culture”

 

Michael Gaudio
Department of Art History
College of Liberal Arts
“Making Liberal Learning in Early Modern Europe”

 

Susan D. Jones
Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior
College of Biological Sciences
History of Science and Technology
Institute of Technology
“Domesticating Anthrax, Globalizing Biomedical Knowledge”

 

Ellen Messer-Davidow
Department of English
College of Liberal Arts
“The Spider’s Web: The Judicial Discourse of Racial Discrimination”

 

Joachim Savelsberg
Department of Sociology
College of Liberal Arts
“Collective Memories of Atrocities: The Formative Role of Trials and Truth Commissions”

 

J. B. Shank
Department of History
College of Liberal Arts
“Making Liberal Learning in Early Modern Europe”

Spring 2008

Elizabeth Beaumont
Department of Political Science
College of Liberal Arts
“A Republic of Rights: Reclaiming the Public Sources of Constitutional Change”

 

Leo C. Chen
Department of Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature
College of Liberal Arts
“Real Time: Cinematic Time and Documentary Reality”

 

Maria Damon
Department of English
College of Liberal Arts
“Text, Textile, Exile”

 

Jigna Desai
Department of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies
College of Liberal Arts
“Planet Bollywood: The Globalization of Indian Cinema”

 

Sumanth Gopinath
Department of Music
College of Liberal Arts
“Ringtones, Or, the Auditory Logic of Globalization”

 

Erin Kelly
Department of Sociology
College of Liberal Arts
“Rethinking Clockworks: Work, Careers and the Life Course”

 

Phyllis Moen
Department of Sociology
College of Liberal Arts
“Rethinking Clockworks: Work, Careers and the Life Course”

 

Marynel Ryan
Department of History
Social Sciences Division
University of Minnesota – Morris
“Locating the Household in the Modern Production of Knowledge”

 

Arun Saldanha
Department of Geography
College of Liberal Arts
“The Philosophical Geography of Race”

 

Hoon Song
Department of Anthropology
College of Liberal Arts
“Cybersuicide and Martyrdom: Sovereignty and Biological Citizenship in Contemporary South Korea”

Residential Fellows 2006-07

Tony C. Brown
Department of English
College of Liberal Arts
“Beside History: Rethinking the Primitive in the Long Eighteenth Century”

 

Siobhan S. Craig
Department of English
College of Liberal Arts
“Rubble Trouble: History, Memory and Desire in the Ruins of Fascism”

 

Lesley Craig-Unkefer
Department of Educational Psychology
College of Education & Human Development
“Knowledge Shared-Benefits Gained: Making a Difference for High Risk Early Childhood Populations”

 

Tracey Deutsch
Department of History
College of Liberal Arts
“Making Change: Supermarkets, Gender, and the Transformation of Consumer Society, 1920-1970”

 

Jan Estep
Department of Art
College of Liberal Arts
“Philosophical Conversations (A Three-part Video Cycle)”

 

Njeri R. Githire
Department of African American & African Studies
College of Liberal Arts
“Voices from Ex/Isle: Caribbean and Indian Ocean Women Writers Break Geographical Confines”

 

George Henderson
Department of Geography
College of Liberal Arts
“Value Beyond Value”

 

Maki Isaka
Department of Asian Languages and Literatures
College of Liberal Arts
“Gender and Onnagata (Actors of Female Impersonation in Kabuki Theater)”

 

Liz Kotz
Department of Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature
College of Liberal Arts
“Durational Structures in Contemporary Art”

 

Scott Laderman
Department of History
University of Minnesota – Duluth
“Witnessing the Past: History, Tourism, and Memory in Postcolonial Vietnam”

 

Christine Marran
Department of Asian Languages and Literatures
College of Liberal Arts
“Male Subjectivity in Japan’s Colonial and Postwar Eras”

 

Jason McGrath
Department of Asian Languages and Literatures
College of Liberal Arts
“Inscribing the Real: Chinese Cinema from the Silent Era to the 21st Century”

 

Patrick J. McNamara
Department of History
College of Liberal Arts
“The Centennial Stage: Mexico’s Old Regime and the Independence Celebrations of 1910”

 

Kevin P. Murphy
Department of History
College of Liberal Arts
“Sexual Knowledge and Progressive Politics at the Turn of the Twentieth Century”

 

Bic Ngo 
Department of Curriculum and Instruction
College of Education & Human Development
“The Salience of ‘Culture’ in Hmong Immigrant Students’ Education: Parental Involvement, Funds of Knowledge and Culturally Relevant Pedagogy”

 

Jason M. Roberts
Department of Political Science
College of Liberal Arts
“Ambition, Competition, and Democratic Responsiveness: Studying Congressional Elections Across Time”

 

Evan Schofer
Department of Sociology
College of Liberal Arts
“Global Models, Local Organizations: Community and Non-Governmental Associations in Comparative Perspective”

 

Ray Schultz 
Theatre Discipline
University of Minnesota – Morris
“The Love, Valor, and Compassion of Terrence McNally: Dramatizing the Gay Revolution from Stonewall to AIDS and Beyond”

 

Robin Stryker
Department of Sociology
College of Liberal Arts
“Social Science in Government Regulation of Equal Employment Opportunity”

Residential Fellows 2005-06

Faculty Fellows

Hisham Bizri
Department of Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature
College of Liberal Arts
Cairo

 

Juliette Cherbuliez
Department of French and Italian
College of Liberal Arts
Cosmopolitanism and the Figure of Medea in French Literary History

 

Susan Craddock
Department of Women’s Studies
Institute for Global Studies
College of Liberal Arts
Tuberculosis and its Treatment in the Twin Cities Somali Community

 

Ann Hironaka
Department of Sociology
College of Liberal Arts
The Formation of Military Strategy

 

Karen Ho
Department of Anthropology
College of Liberal Arts
“Eradicating Poverty Through Profit: Wall Street, Microfinance Institutions, and the Commercialization of Capital Market Access”

 

Chris Isett
Department of History
College of Liberal Arts
Nutrition and Well Being in Eighteenth-Century China: An Anthropometric Study

 

Lynn Lukkas
Department of Art
College of Liberal Arts
Telling Time

 

Rachel Schurman
Department of Sociology
College of Liberal Arts
Making Biotech History: How Social Activists Changed the Course of Genetic Engineering in Agriculture

 

Madelon Sprengnether
Department of English
College of Liberal Arts
Great River Road

 

Dara Strolovitch
Department of Political Science
College of Liberal Arts
Affirmative Advocacy: Race, Class, and Gender in Interest Group Politics

 

Shaden M. Tageldin
Department of Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature
College of Liberal Arts
Disarming Words: Empire and the Seductions of Translation in Egypt

Visiting Fellows

Visiting Fellows, Spring 2006

John Gery
English, University of New Orleans
Director of the Ezra Pound Center for Literature, Brunnenburg, Italy
Have at You Now! and Pound’s Venice: A Walking Guide 

 

Biljana D. Obradovic
English, Xavier University of Louisiana
The Unnecessary Chronicle

Visiting Fellows, Fall 2005

 

John Dobry
Music
Tulane University

 

Peter Gerlich Political Science
University of Vienna

 

 

Emily Lambertsen Minnie
Studio Art
Tulane University