University of Minnesota
University of Minnesota
http://www.umn.edu/
612-625-5000

September 15, 2016, at 3:30pm
Northrop — Crosby Seminar Room

A panel discussion exploring how the roles of race, religion and gender are influencing American politics, and particularly the 2016 elections. Perspectives from a variety of fields across the University of Minnesota looking at the current political climate, and its impact on the future of American government.

September 22, 2016, at 3:30pm
Northrop — Crosby Seminar Room

Following the police killing of Philando Castile, a handful of media outlets covered the stark racial disparities in Minnesota, often with an air of shock given widely circulated narratives of Minnesota’s progressiveness. Such narratives often undermine efforts to understand these disparities; this panel responds with stories that provide a different starting point for diagnosing problems and generating solutions, with a focus on housing, arts and education.

September 29, 2016, at 3:30pm
Northrop — Crosby Seminar Room

This talk examines the relationship between scientific innovation and social inequity. Drawing on work that investigates how racial and caste distinctions shape genomic science in Mexico, South Africa, India, and the US, Ruha Benjamin argues that it is the epistemic and normative dexterity of the field — not its strict enforcement of social hierarchy — that makes it powerful, problematic and, for some, profitable.

October 6, 2016, at 3:30pm
Martin Library Rotunda, UMD

Inclusive game development is the process of actively involving players and community members in determining their own representations in games, with the intent to ensure that the game first and foremost meets the needs of the players, responds to and addresses issues that the community deems important, and more directly respects players as creators rather than simply consumers. This presentation features Charles McGregor, founder of Tribe Games.

October 13, 2016, at 3:30pm
Northrop — Best Buy Theater

This panel discussion will examine Dracula in context, including film, theater, and dance in connection with Canada’s Royal Winnipeg Ballet’s performance at Northrop on October 20th. Panelists: Juliet Burba, Chief Curator of Collections and Exhibits at The Bakken Museum; Joanie Smith, Theatre Arts and Dance, UMN; Margaret Werry, Theatre Arts and Dance, UMN.

October 20, 2016 at 3:30pm
Northrop — Crosby Seminar Room

Beryl Satter’s 2009 book Family Properties uncovered the ways that predatory real estate practices impoverished urban black communities in the mid-twentieth century. Her new work on ShoreBank (1973-2010), a Chicago-based community development bank that provided African Americans with fair access to credit, carries her analysis of structural racism through the post-1973 transformations in banking and finance.

October 27, 2016, at 3:30pm
Northrop — Crosby Seminar Room

Filmmaker Deann Borshay Liem screens three short films that touch on the legacies of the Korean War from the perspective of a divided family, a Korean adoptee, and women activists who cross the DMZ to promote peace. These stories challenge the notion that the Korean War is ‘forgotten’ and that war ends and peace begins when the guns are silenced.

November 3, 2016, at 3:30pm
Northrop — Crosby Seminar Room

Join local artists as they define, discuss, and unpack a variety of perspectives on political theater. What are some of the many different ways art and politics interact here in the Twin Cities, across the United States, and beyond? How are artists engaging with the upcoming election and highly polarized political climate? NOTE: This session may include brief performances and optional opportunities for participation!

November 10, 2016, at 3:30pm
Northrop — Crosby Seminar Room

Byzantium – the continuation of the Roman empire in the East until 1453 AD – has regularly been cast in the West as a deformed version of Hellenism, Christianity, and Rome, feminized and orientalized, exoticized and condemned, in order to make way for western imperial and ideological projects. Focusing on the false names that the eastern Roman empire has been given over the centuries, this lecture will show how its very existence inconvenienced western regimes.

November 17, 2016, at 3:30pm
Northrop — Crosby Seminar Room

Presentation and discussion on the global refugee crisis and its implications for North America by reformulating immigrant and refugee rights movements within a transnational analysis of capitalism, labor exploitation, settler colonialism, state building, and racialized empire. Harsha Walia is the cofounder of the migrant justice group No One Is Illegal and author of Undoing Border Imperialism.

December 1, 2016, at 3:30pm
Northrop — Best Buy Theater

Khalil Gibran Muhammad is a professor of history, race and public policy at Harvard Kennedy School and the Suzanne Young Murray Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. His academic work focuses on racial criminalization and the origins of the carceral state. He is the author of The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America.

December 8, 2016, at 3:30pm
Northrop – Crosby Seminar Room

Focusing on the 1920s expedition filmmaking of William J. Morden, field associate in mammalogy at the American Museum of Natural History, Alison Griffiths considers the expedition film, a relatively unexplored cinematic mode defined by restlessness and networks of transportation, in the light of an eclectic mix of interdisciplinary theory.