University of Minnesota
University of Minnesota
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September 10, 2015, at 4:00pm
Northrop — Crosby Seminar Room

In the Thursdays at Four series we feature an eclectic mix of scholars, artists, and practitioners from diverse disciplines who present in a variety of forms, including lecture, discussion, and performance. The fall series will include discussions on educational privatization, rights and representation, drones, American archaeology and civic engagement, and choreography and artistic creation.

September 17, 2015, at 4:00pm
Northrop — Crosby Seminar Room

with Peter J. Seiler, Assistant Professor of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics, and Institute on the Environment Resident Fellow; Volkan Isler, Associate Professor of Computer Science; Ian MacRae, Professor of Entomology; William McGeveran, Associate Professor of Law; and Cassandra Isackson, Director, MnDOT Office of Aeronautics.

September 24, 2015, at 4:00pm
Northrop — Best Buy Theater

NOW is the time to discuss community-based reform efforts designed to improve student achievement and school success as an alternative to the decades-long era of increasing private control in education. Dr. Julian Vasquez Heilig is a Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies and Director of the Doctorate in Educational Leadership at California State Sacramento.

October 1, 2015, at 4:00pm
Northrop — Crosby Seminar Room

For more than a century and a half, the Sand Creek Massacre has been at the center of struggles over history and memory in the American West: from the government investigations launched in the aftermath; to memorials erected in Colorado; to the impact of popular histories; to the recently opened National Historic Site. Ari Kelman, Professor of History at Penn State, will discuss the meaning and impact of the longstanding fight to shape and control memories of Sand Creek.

October 8, 2015, at 4:00pm
Northrop — Crosby Seminar Room

Paul Shackel is Director of the University of Maryland’s Center for Heritage Resource Studies. He received a 3-year NSF Research award that allowed him to train undergraduates in archaeology and explore the historic town of New Philadelphia, IL, the earliest known town founded and registered in a state by an African American in the antebellum United States. The development of civic engagement activities became an important part of this archaeological program.

October 15, at 4:00pm
Northrop — Crosby Seminar Room

Ahmed Ragab is Assistant Professor of Science and Religion at Harvard Divinity School as well as a physician, historian, and scholar of the medieval and modern Middle East. His work includes the history and development of medieval Islamic sciences, the relationship between science and religion in the medieval and modern Middle East, the history of medieval Islamic hospitals, and the intellectual and cultural history of women in the region.

October 22, 2015, at 4:00pm
Northrop — Best Buy Theater

Seán Curran‘s dance journey has taken him from Irish step dancing to lead dancer with Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company to the original cast of STOMP. His new work, Dream’d in a Dream, was a result of another journey—one his company took to the far reaches of Central Asia as cultural ambassadors of the U.S. State Department—and was inspired by the haunting and exquisite beauty of traditional Kyrgyz music.

October 29, 2015, at 4:00pm
Northrop — Crosby Seminar Room

Trigger warnings are designed to prevent unprepared encounters with certain materials or subjects for the benefit of people who have a strong and damaging emotional response (e.g. post-traumatic flashbacks or urges to harm themselves) to such topics. We will move away from the hard line legalities of first Amendment speech to ask: how do we create a community in which all members feel secure and respected, in which we can still examine difficult and controversial issues?

November 5, 2015, at 4:00pm
Northrop — Crosby Seminar Room

What happens when artists refute music as a political act yet by force of circumstance are embroiled in political violence, when masculine bravado that produces eloquent art at once can fuel conflict? These questions collide in South Africa today, where performing and recording Zulu music challenges our understanding of the organization of the sensory world.

November 12, 2015, at 4:00pm
Northrop — Crosby Seminar Room

What does this look like here? One answer, of course, is that it depends on whom you ask. In connection with the University Strategic Plan’s call for community-engaged scholarship, join in a conversation about it from the lens of multiple disciplines. Speakers will offer a mix of key concepts and examples in a lively presentation to launch a discussion of critical questions and practical issues.

November 19, 2015, at 4:00pm
Northrop — Crosby Seminar Room

A staged reading of a play by IAS Fellow Cindy Garcia and dramaturg Lucy Mae San Pablo Burns, presenting a salsa guide for women (based on actual experiences). Burns is an Associate Professor at UCLA’s Asian American Studies Department. She is the author of Puro Arte: On the Filipino Performing Body. García is an Assistant Professor, dance theorist, performance ethnographer, and playwright in Theatre Arts and Dance at University of Minnesota.

December 3, 2015, at 4:00pm
Northrop – Crosby Seminar Room

For the past eight years, Nicholas Jordan and Valentine Cadieux have worked with their respective communities of practice to develop tools for communicative practice and systemic understanding. Current work concerns skill sharing and land trust and access issues, as well as a pilot joint effort in urban agriculture. This conversational presentation will explore the role of students and scholars in food and agriculture movement work!

December 10, 2015, at 4:00pm
Northrop — Crosby Seminar Room

Nearly two decades ago William Paulson declared that “electronically stored and retrieved text, in comparison with its printed predecessor, is almost infinitely malleable and labile”. To complicate this familiar before/after contrast, Deidre Lynch surveys the multitude of ways in which bookish people in the early 19th century conceptualized texts and images, poems and pictures as detachable and re-attachable slips and scraps.