Institute for Advanced Study http://ias.umn.edu Fri, 06 May 2016 19:30:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Physical Computing Hackathon. May 6, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/05/06/hackathon-5-06/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/05/06/hackathon-5-06/#respond Fri, 06 May 2016 19:30:03 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22601 Physical Computing and the Internet of Things: Hackathon

Friday, May 6, 2016, 2:30-4:00pm
Northrop 110 (Innovation Lab)

Free and open to the public

2015-10-02 smallerThe Internet of Things (IoT) describes the network and data that emerges from adding physical computing components such as sensors, actuators, and network adapters to everyday objects. This new area of research promises to revolutionize our interaction with the physical world by providing levels of analytics and automation previously reserved for digital domains. The IAS Physical Computing Collaborative hosts weekly “hack” sessions to develop physical computing skills and experiment with technologies like Arduinos, littleBits, and LilyPads. If you are a studentin any major and with any level of experience—you are particularly encouraged to join us!

To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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Structural transformation as the pathway out of poverty. May 5, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/05/05/timmer/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/05/05/timmer/#respond Thu, 05 May 2016 21:00:42 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22494 Structural transformation as the pathway out of poverty: Policy approaches to managing the process

Thursday, May 5, 2016, at 4:00pm
Crosby Seminar Room, 240 Northrop

Free and open to the public

timmer cropThe structural transformation is the defining characteristic of the development process, both cause and effect of modern economic growth. The desirable endpoint is an economy and society where agriculture as an economic activity has no distinguishing characteristics from other sectors, at least in terms of the productivity of labor and capital, or the location of poverty. The pathway out of poverty leads to the city.

C. Peter Timmer is a Fellow of the Center for Global Development. He is an authority on agricultural development, food security, and the world rice economy who has published scores of papers and books on these topics. He has served as a professor at Stanford, Cornell, three faculties at Harvard, and the University of California, San Diego, where he was also the dean of the Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies. Timmer is now the Cabot Professor of Development Studies, emeritus, at Harvard University.

To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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Physical Computing Hackathon. April 29, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/04/29/hackathon-4-29/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/04/29/hackathon-4-29/#respond Fri, 29 Apr 2016 19:30:29 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22589 Physical Computing and the Internet of Things: Hackathon

Friday, April 29, 2016, 2:30-4:00pm
Northrop 110 (Innovation Lab)

Free and open to the public

2015-10-02 smallerThe Internet of Things (IoT) describes the network and data that emerges from adding physical computing components such as sensors, actuators, and network adapters to everyday objects. This new area of research promises to revolutionize our interaction with the physical world by providing levels of analytics and automation previously reserved for digital domains. The IAS Physical Computing Collaborative hosts weekly “hack” sessions to develop physical computing skills and experiment with technologies like Arduinos, littleBits, and LilyPads. If you are a studentin any major and with any level of experience—you are particularly encouraged to join us!

To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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Getting Crusaded: History and the Targets of Medieval Holy War. April 28, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/04/28/cobb/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/04/28/cobb/#respond Thu, 28 Apr 2016 21:00:11 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22493 Getting Crusaded:
History and the Targets of Medieval Holy War

Thursday, April 28, 2016, at 4:00pm
Crosby Seminar Room, 240 Northrop

Free and open to the public

cobb cropThe study of the Crusades, that sequence of papally-sponsored holy wars against various enemies of the Church, has never been more exciting. These movements are part of the warp and weft of medieval history, and yet (rightly or wrongly) weigh heavily upon the modern and contemporary imagination. And yet, for all that, even the best-intentioned histories of the Crusades tend to be descendants of the same flattering tales told by supporters of the crusades since the Middle Ages, rooted solidly in a “Crusader’s-eye” version of these events. What happens when we consider these events from the perspective of the “crusaded” rather than the crusaders? How does listening to the targets of medieval holy war, on every shore of the Mediterranean, help us to understand this central aspect of European history?

Paul M. Cobb, Professor of Near Eastern Languages and Literatures at University of Pennsylvania, is a social and cultural historian of the pre-modern Islamic world. His areas of interest include the history of memory, historiography, Islamic relations with the West, and travel and exploration. He is, in particular, a recognized authority on the history of the medieval Levant and of the Crusades in their Islamic context. He is the author of numerous books and articles, including  White Banners: Contention in ‘Abbasid Syria, 750-880 (SUNY Press, 2001); Usama ibn Munqidh: Warrior-Poet of the Age of Crusades  (Oneworld, 2005); and The Book of Contemplation: Islam and the Crusades, a translation of the “memoirs” and other works of Usama ibn Munqidh (Penguin Classics, 2008). He is also the co-editor (with Wout van Bekkum) of Strategies of Medieval Communal Identity: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam (Peeters, 2003) and (with Antoine Borrut) of Umayyad Legacies: History and Memory from Syria to Spain (E. J. Brill, 2010). His newest book is The Race for Paradise: An Islamic History of the Crusades (Oxford 2013). 

To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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Physical Computing Hackathon. April 22, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/04/22/hackathon-4-22/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/04/22/hackathon-4-22/#respond Fri, 22 Apr 2016 19:30:47 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22599 Physical Computing and the Internet of Things: Hackathon

Friday, April 22, 2016, 2:30-4:00pm
Northrop 110 (Innovation Lab)

Free and open to the public

2015-10-02 smallerThe Internet of Things (IoT) describes the network and data that emerges from adding physical computing components such as sensors, actuators, and network adapters to everyday objects. This new area of research promises to revolutionize our interaction with the physical world by providing levels of analytics and automation previously reserved for digital domains. The IAS Physical Computing Collaborative hosts weekly “hack” sessions to develop physical computing skills and experiment with technologies like Arduinos, littleBits, and LilyPads. If you are a studentin any major and with any level of experience—you are particularly encouraged to join us!

To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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“Newes from the Dead”: an unnatural moment in the history of Natural Philosophy. April 21, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/04/21/taylor/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/04/21/taylor/#respond Thu, 21 Apr 2016 21:00:41 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22483 “Newes from the Dead”:
an unnatural moment in the history of Natural Philosophy

Thursday, April 21, 2016, at 4:00pm
Crosby Seminar Room, 240 Northrop

Free and open to the public

In 1650 Oxford is in the midst of the Bloody civil war, in which divine and secular authority are both at issue. A young woman, hanged for infanticide, is given over to the university scholars, for an anatomy lesson. Shockingly she ‘comes back to life’ on the anatomy table. This paper raises a series of meditations about philosophy, the history of science, relations of gender, knowledge, and power. Suggested background reading from Prof. Taylor: Laura Gowing, “Secret Births and Infanticide in Seventeenth-Century England”.

Professor Jane Taylor holds the Wole Soyinka Chair of Drama and Theatre Studies at the University of Leeds. She is a South African who has worked extensively across creative arts and literary/cultural scholarship. For a decade she held the Skye Chair of Dramatic Art at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, and has been for several years a Visiting Professor at the University of Chicago. She has been a Visiting Fellow at Oxford and at Cambridge, and has been a recipient of Mellon and Rockefeller Fellowships.

Taylor has a scholarly and creative interest in puppetry and has written plays for Handspring Puppet Company (makers of War Horse). She edited the critical study of Handspring Puppet Company, and is on the Board of the Company. She writes on questions of the history of performance and is working on a large-scale study of the History and Theory of the Performance of Sincerity, an undertaking that examines the impact of the Reformation on modes of self-presentation. She also writes about the work of contemporary artist/director William Kentridge.

In the 1990s she established Fault Lines, a series of cultural responses to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in South Africa. Her play (with Handspring), Ubu and the Truth Commission, has been staged in several contexts of political upheaval, and Taylor frequently engages in public discussion around the meanings and questions provoked by ideas of transitional justice. Taylor also has two published novels; one of which (The Transplant Men) concerns the first human heart transplant that took place in South Africa in the 1960s. She teaches within the newly emerging discipline of Medical Humanities. In 2011 she staged a new play (After Cardenio) that she had written on a commission from the Renaissance scholar, Stephen Greenblatt.

Taylor will be keynote speaker at the Inaugural University of Minnesota International African Studies Conference Fault Lines: Rethinking Temporal and Disciplinary Traditions in African Studies, organized with the intention of bringing together Africanist scholars from disparate geographical spaces in order to create new opportunities for discussion and collaboration.

This event is cosponsored by the Consortium for the Study of the Premodern World, the Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Global Change, the African Studies Initiative, the Program in the History of Medicine, and the Departments of History, Theatre Arts and Dance, African American and African Studies, Anthropology, Curriculum and Instruction, and Sociology. To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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Physical Computing Hackathon. April 15, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/04/15/hackathon-4-15/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/04/15/hackathon-4-15/#respond Fri, 15 Apr 2016 19:30:46 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22598 Physical Computing and the Internet of Things: Hackathon

Friday, April 15, 2016, 2:30-4:00pm
Northrop 110 (Innovation Lab)

Free and open to the public

2015-10-02 smallerThe Internet of Things (IoT) describes the network and data that emerges from adding physical computing components such as sensors, actuators, and network adapters to everyday objects. This new area of research promises to revolutionize our interaction with the physical world by providing levels of analytics and automation previously reserved for digital domains. The IAS Physical Computing Collaborative hosts weekly “hack” sessions to develop physical computing skills and experiment with technologies like Arduinos, littleBits, and LilyPads. If you are a studentin any major and with any level of experience—you are particularly encouraged to join us!

To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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Why Philosophy Here & Now? Critical & Transformative Challenges. April 14, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/04/14/dotson/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/04/14/dotson/#respond Thu, 14 Apr 2016 21:00:46 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22481 Why Philosophy Here and Now? Critical and Transformative Challenges to a Conservative Discipline

Thursday, April 14, 2016, at 4:00pm
Crosby Seminar Room, 240 Northrop

Free and open to the public

Kristie Dotson is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Michigan State University. Having received her M.A. and Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Memphis, she also received a MA from the University of Illinois at Chicago in Literature and a BA in African American Studies and English Literature from Coe College. Professor Dotson researches in epistemology, feminist philosophy (particularly Black feminism and feminist epistemology), and critical philosophy of race.

Naomi Scheman is Professor of Philosophy and Gender Women and Sexuality Studies at the University of Minnesota, and a guest researcher at the Umeå Centre for Gender Studies in Sweden. She received her BA from Barnard College and her PhD from Harvard University. Her research interests include politics of epistemology, feminist theory, and trustworthiness and community engagement.

kristie dotsonTo request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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Physical Computing Hackathon. April 8, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/04/08/hackathon-4-08/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/04/08/hackathon-4-08/#respond Fri, 08 Apr 2016 19:30:44 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22597 Physical Computing and the Internet of Things: Hackathon

Friday, April 8, 2016, 2:30-4:00pm
Northrop 110 (Innovation Lab)

Free and open to the public

2015-10-02 smallerThe Internet of Things (IoT) describes the network and data that emerges from adding physical computing components such as sensors, actuators, and network adapters to everyday objects. This new area of research promises to revolutionize our interaction with the physical world by providing levels of analytics and automation previously reserved for digital domains. The IAS Physical Computing Collaborative hosts weekly “hack” sessions to develop physical computing skills and experiment with technologies like Arduinos, littleBits, and LilyPads. If you are a studentin any major and with any level of experience—you are particularly encouraged to join us!

To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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The Analogy Problem in Human Trafficking Reform. Julietta Hua, April 7, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/04/07/hua/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/04/07/hua/#respond Thu, 07 Apr 2016 21:00:36 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22279 The Analogy Problem in Human Trafficking Reform

Thursday, April 7, 2016, at 4:00pm
Crosby Seminar Room, 240 Northrop

Free and open to the public

hua screenshotWhat work takes place when slavery becomes the accepted language through which we come to understand human trafficking? Taking the website slaveryfootprint.org as a starting point, I consider the ways the slavery analogy restricts how we understand human trafficking, and offer instead an alternative method of accounting, which, following the work of Karen Barad, Michelle Wright and others, takes seriously the epiphenomenal as a way to re-consider the long inheritance of trans-Atlantic slavery as interconnected with, but not analogical to, human trafficking.

Julietta Hua is Associate Professor of Women and Gender Studies at San Francisco State University. With a PhD in Ethnic Studies, she is the author of Trafficking Women’s Rights (2011), which looks at U.S. Anti-Trafficking law and policy. In addition to publishing on human rights and trafficking, she has also published on chimpanzee sanctuaries and the limits of rights framework.

To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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Physical Computing Hackathon. April 1, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/04/01/hackathon-4-01/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/04/01/hackathon-4-01/#respond Fri, 01 Apr 2016 19:30:41 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22596 Physical Computing and the Internet of Things: Hackathon

Friday, April 1, 2016, 2:30-4:00pm
Northrop 110 (Innovation Lab)

Free and open to the public

2015-10-02 smallerThe Internet of Things (IoT) describes the network and data that emerges from adding physical computing components such as sensors, actuators, and network adapters to everyday objects. This new area of research promises to revolutionize our interaction with the physical world by providing levels of analytics and automation previously reserved for digital domains. The IAS Physical Computing Collaborative hosts weekly “hack” sessions to develop physical computing skills and experiment with technologies like Arduinos, littleBits, and LilyPads. If you are a studentin any major and with any level of experience—you are particularly encouraged to join us!

To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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The 21st Century Engaged Public Research University: A Call to Action. March 31, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/03/31/action/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/03/31/action/#respond Thu, 31 Mar 2016 21:00:21 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22480 The 21st Century Engaged Public Research University:
A Call to Action

Thursday, March 31, 2016, at 4:00pm
Commons Hotel, 615 Washington Ave SE

Free and open to the public

Photo credit: Thomas Fisher

A Fall 2015 panel on community-engaged scholarship asked “What does ‘The 21st Century Engaged Public Research University’ look like here?”. Continuing the conversation from the lens of multiple disciplines, we present a call to action. This event concludes the Office for Public Engagement’s day-long conference on Meeting Grand Challenges Through Community-Engaged Research, Teaching, and Learning, which follows the University’s annual Public Engagement Leaders Retreat.

To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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Physical Computing Hackathon. March 25, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/03/25/hackathon-3-25/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/03/25/hackathon-3-25/#respond Fri, 25 Mar 2016 19:30:40 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22595 Physical Computing and the Internet of Things: Hackathon

Friday, March 25, 2016, 2:30-4:00pm
Northrop 110 (Innovation Lab)

Free and open to the public

2015-10-02 smallerThe Internet of Things (IoT) describes the network and data that emerges from adding physical computing components such as sensors, actuators, and network adapters to everyday objects. This new area of research promises to revolutionize our interaction with the physical world by providing levels of analytics and automation previously reserved for digital domains. The IAS Physical Computing Collaborative hosts weekly “hack” sessions to develop physical computing skills and experiment with technologies like Arduinos, littleBits, and LilyPads. If you are a studentin any major and with any level of experience—you are particularly encouraged to join us!

To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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Love v. Duty: Mark Morris’s “Dido and Aeneas”. March 24, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/03/24/dido/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/03/24/dido/#respond Thu, 24 Mar 2016 21:00:22 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22477 Love versus Duty:
A Conversation about Mark Morris’s “Dido and Aeneas”

Thursday, March 24, 2016, at 4:00pm
Best Buy Theater, 4th Floor of Northrop

Free and open to the public

mark morris reduce size crop
Mark Morris Dance Group in Dido and Aeneas. Photo © Susana Millman.

Queen Dido of Carthage is forsaken by her love, the Trojan Prince Aeneas, when he is reminded of his duty to establish a new city in Italy. From its origins in Greco-Roman myth, through Virgil’s epic poem, to Henry Purcell’s opera, the story of Dido and Aeneas, with its themes of love versus duty and the obligations to self versus leadership, have resonated through millennia. Our panelists will discuss the story of Dido and Aeneas in its incarnations in literature, music, and dance and will consider its relevance today. This discussion takes place one week prior to Mark Morris Dance Group’s performance of Dido and Aeneas at Northrop on March 30 with live orchestra, chorus, and soloists, conducted by Mark Morris. Moderated by Sonja Kuftinec and featuring panelists Provost Karen Hanson and Professors Nita Krevans and Kelley Harness.

Provost Karen Hanson received her bachelor of arts, summa cum laude, in philosophy and mathematics at the University of Minnesota in 1970. She went on to earn both her master’s and doctoral degrees in philosophy from Harvard University in 1980. Prior to returning to Minnesota, Hanson served as provost at the Bloomington campus of Indiana University and executive vice president of that university from July 2007 to January 2012. Provost Hanson’s research interests are in the philosophy of mind, ethics and aesthetics, and American philosophy. She has published many articles and essays in these areas and is the author of the book The Self Imagined: Philosophical Reflections on the Social Character of Psyche and a co-editor of the book Romantic Revolutions: Criticism and Theory. She has twice been elected to the executive committee of the Central Division of the American Philosophical Association (APA) and to the APA National Board of Officers.

Kelley Harness is Associate Professor of Music at the University of Minnesota. Her recent scholarly work concentrates on the interrelationships between music, theatrical imagery, and politics in 16th- and 17th-century Italy. Her work relies on musical analysis to reveal a composition’s allegorical messages and combines archival research and interpretive models from literary criticism, art history, and anthropology; her teaching reflects this interdisciplinary approach. Harness wants her students to master various tools in order to penetrate the expressive and intellectual layers of specific musical works. She is the author of Echoes of Women’s Voices: Music, Art, and Female Patronage in Early Modern Florence (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006), as well as numerous articles in journals and collections of essays. Her current research focuses on references to musical performance in 16th- and 17th-century Italian plays. Prof. Harness at the IAS.

Nita Krevans is Associate Professor of Classical and Near Eastern Studies at the University of Minnesota. Her areas of expertise include Greek and latin poetry, Hellenistic literature, and the history of the book. Krevans was co-PI on a 2011 Minnesota Futures grant for a project entitled “The Data Deluge: Applying Data Processing Techniques Derived from Astrophysics Citizen Science Projects to Research Problems in Egyptian Papyrology”, about which she spoke at the IAS in December 2012.

Sonja Kuftinec is Professor of Theatre Arts and Dance at the University of Minnesota. Her areas of specialization include performance and social change, community-based theater, theatrical facilitation: Middle East, Balkans, 19th- and 20th-century American theater, history and literature, women in theater, performance studies, Balkan theater, and Cornerstone Theater Company. She is the author of Theatre, Facilitation, and Nation Formation in the Balkans and Middle East (2009) and Staging America: Cornerstone and Community-Based Theater (2003). Prof. Kuftinec at the IAS.

Morris speaks on the work’s conception.

This talk is cosponsored by Northrop. To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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Physical Computing Hackathon. March 11, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/03/11/hackathon-3-11/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/03/11/hackathon-3-11/#respond Fri, 11 Mar 2016 19:30:39 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22594 Physical Computing and the Internet of Things: Hackathon

Friday, March 11, 2016, 2:30-4:00pm
Northrop 110 (Innovation Lab)

Free and open to the public

2015-10-02 smallerThe Internet of Things (IoT) describes the network and data that emerges from adding physical computing components such as sensors, actuators, and network adapters to everyday objects. This new area of research promises to revolutionize our interaction with the physical world by providing levels of analytics and automation previously reserved for digital domains. The IAS Physical Computing Collaborative hosts weekly “hack” sessions to develop physical computing skills and experiment with technologies like Arduinos, littleBits, and LilyPads. If you are a studentin any major and with any level of experience—you are particularly encouraged to join us!

To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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Ten Years of the IAS: A Collaborative Celebration. March 10, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/03/10/ten/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/03/10/ten/#respond Thu, 10 Mar 2016 21:00:19 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22476 Ten Years of the IAS: A Collaborative Celebration

Thursday, March 10, 2016, at 4:00pm
Crosby Seminar Room, 240 Northrop

Free and open to the public

ten years of ias reduce sizeTo request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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Physical Computing Hackathon. March 4, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/03/04/hackathon-3-04/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/03/04/hackathon-3-04/#respond Fri, 04 Mar 2016 19:30:37 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22593 Physical Computing and the Internet of Things: Hackathon

Friday, March 4, 2016, 2:30-4:00pm
Northrop 110 (Innovation Lab)

Free and open to the public

2015-10-02 smallerThe Internet of Things (IoT) describes the network and data that emerges from adding physical computing components such as sensors, actuators, and network adapters to everyday objects. This new area of research promises to revolutionize our interaction with the physical world by providing levels of analytics and automation previously reserved for digital domains. The IAS Physical Computing Collaborative hosts weekly “hack” sessions to develop physical computing skills and experiment with technologies like Arduinos, littleBits, and LilyPads. If you are a studentin any major and with any level of experience—you are particularly encouraged to join us!

To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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Vital Platforms: Towards A Feminist Theory of Human Media. A talk by Neferti Tadiar. http://ias.umn.edu/2016/03/04/tadiar/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/03/04/tadiar/#respond Fri, 04 Mar 2016 18:00:26 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22684 Vital Platforms: Towards A Feminist Theory of Human Media

Friday, March 4, 2016 1:30-3:00pm
Crosby Seminar Room, 240 Northrop

Free and open to the public

This talk proposes a feminist theory of forms of human media – exemplifying the use or actuation of humans as the instruments of other humans’ will and expressive agency – as integral but overlooked component forces in the colonial and postcolonial expansion of global capital. Focusing on historical and contemporary Philippine social contexts, Tadiar explores the gendered and racialized mediatic function of humans, or what she calls “vital platforms”, as a way of understanding the continuing role of forms of non-free life in the contemporary production of disposability and value.

tadiarNeferti X. M. Tadiar is author of Things Fall Away: Philippine Historical Experience and the Makings of Globalization (2009) and Fantasy-Production: Sexual Economies and Other Philippine Consequences for the New World Order (2004). She is Professor of Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies at Barnard College, Columbia University and Co-Editor of the journal Social Text. Her current book project is entitled Remaindered Life.

Cosponsored by the Department of Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature; the Program in Asian American Studies; the Race, Indigeneity, Gender and Sexuality Initiative; and the Department of American Studies.

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Tight oil/fast oil: life and death in the Bakken oil fields. March 3, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/03/03/braun/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/03/03/braun/#respond Thu, 03 Mar 2016 21:00:54 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22471 Tight oil/fast oil: life and death in the Bakken oil fields

Thursday, March 3, 2016, at 4:00pm
Crosby Seminar Room, 240 Northrop

Free and open to the public

Workers have been dying on the job with unusual frequency in the North Dakota oil boom. This talk explores the geological, technological, and political-economic conditions by which ‘tight oil’ becomes ‘fast oil’, with consequences for workers and communities locally, nationally, and globally.

Bruce Braun is Professor of Geography, Environment and Society at the University of Minnesota. His research interests include geosocial formations, geontology, extraction and extractive capital; green urbanism and apparatuses of government, critical studies of urban sustainability, urban resilience as mode of government, design activism; the politics of ‘life’, political rationality and biological existence, the securitization of biological life, biosecurity and empire.

To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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Physical Computing Hackathon. February 26, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/02/26/hackathon-2-26/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/02/26/hackathon-2-26/#respond Fri, 26 Feb 2016 19:30:35 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22592 Physical Computing and the Internet of Things: Hackathon

Friday, February 26, 2016, 2:30-4:00pm
Northrop 110 (Innovation Lab)

Free and open to the public

2015-10-02 smallerThe Internet of Things (IoT) describes the network and data that emerges from adding physical computing components such as sensors, actuators, and network adapters to everyday objects. This new area of research promises to revolutionize our interaction with the physical world by providing levels of analytics and automation previously reserved for digital domains. The IAS Physical Computing Collaborative hosts weekly “hack” sessions to develop physical computing skills and experiment with technologies like Arduinos, littleBits, and LilyPads. If you are a studentin any major and with any level of experience—you are particularly encouraged to join us!

To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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New Work and Critical Questions in American Indian and Indigenous Studies. February 25, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/02/25/indigenous/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/02/25/indigenous/#respond Thu, 25 Feb 2016 21:00:11 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22419 Building on the Past for the Future: New Work and Critical Questions in American Indian and Indigenous Studies

Thursday, February 25, 2016, at 4:00pm
Crosby Seminar Room, 240 Northrop

Free and open to the public

those-who-belong doerfler crop small2Join UMN faculty David Chang, Jean O’Brien, and Brenda Child in conversation as they discuss their recent work in the dynamic field of American Indian and Indigenous Studies, addressing critical questions through lenses of research, memoir, activism, and pedagogy.

David Chang is Associate Professor of History, American Studies, and American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota. His second book, The World and All the Things Upon It: Native Hawaiian Geographies of Exploration (May 2016 University of Minnesota Press), traces how Kanaka Maoli (indigenous Hawaiian people) in the nineteenth century explored the outside world, generated their own understandings of it, and placed themselves strategically in the discursive constructions of global geography they created.

Brenda Child is Associate Professor of American Studies and American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota. She is author of Holding Our World Together: Ojibwe Women and the Survival of Community, Boarding School Seasons: American Indian Families, 1900-1940, and Away From Home: American Indian Boarding School Experiences, 1879-2000.

Jean O’Brien is Professor of History, American Studies, and American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota. In 2015, she was named McKnight Distinguished University Professor, and in 2014 received the Western History Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award in American Indian History. She is author of Firsting and Lasting: Writing Indians out of Existence in New England as well as Dispossession by Degrees: Indian Land and Identity in Natick, Massachusetts, 1650–1790.

To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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Physical Computing Hackathon. February 19, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/02/19/hackathon-2-19/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/02/19/hackathon-2-19/#respond Fri, 19 Feb 2016 19:30:34 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22591 Physical Computing and the Internet of Things: Hackathon

Friday, February 19, 2016, 2:30-4:00pm
Northrop 110 (Innovation Lab)

Free and open to the public

2015-10-02 smallerThe Internet of Things (IoT) describes the network and data that emerges from adding physical computing components such as sensors, actuators, and network adapters to everyday objects. This new area of research promises to revolutionize our interaction with the physical world by providing levels of analytics and automation previously reserved for digital domains. The IAS Physical Computing Collaborative hosts weekly “hack” sessions to develop physical computing skills and experiment with technologies like Arduinos, littleBits, and LilyPads. If you are a studentin any major and with any level of experience—you are particularly encouraged to join us!

To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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Energy consumption and economic growth: an altered relationship. http://ias.umn.edu/2016/02/18/hirsh/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/02/18/hirsh/#respond Thu, 18 Feb 2016 21:00:14 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22467 Energy consumption and economic growth:
The history (and possible future) of an altered relationship

Thursday, February 18, 2016, at 4:00pm
Crosby Seminar Room, 240 Northrop

Free and open to the public

hirsh2
Image Source

A blend of history, engineering, and policy, this talk examines the relationship between energy consumption and economic growth in the United States. In a way that appeared to make eminent sense, increased energy consumption propelled economic activity for more than a century. But when the country faced an energy crisis in the 1970s, government, business, and academic policy analysts began questioning unspoken assumptions behind that relationship. As important, they wondered whether efforts to conserve energy or use energy more efficiently would stall the nation’s economic engine, resulting in declining social welfare.

The talk will explore the origin of the relationship between energy consumption and economic growth and why it has held so much meaning in the technical, policy, and cultural realms. It will also examine the causes of recent changes in the relationship and some consequences of those changes. Paying special attention to the connections between economic growth and electrical energy consumption, the presentation (and subsequent discussion) will interrogate the role of new methods to generate and use electricity that have contributed to economic growth without greatly increasing the amount of energy consumption.

Richard Hirsh is a professor of History of Technology and Science & Technology Studies at Virginia Tech. His academic background is unusual, since he holds a Master’s degree in Physics and a Ph.D. in History of Science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Though previously writing about astronomy performed from outer space (published as Glimpsing an Invisible Universe in 1983), Richard turned his attention to the recent history of electric utilities. In 1989, he published Technology and Transformation in the American Electric Utility Industry, a book that describes the technological, managerial, and cultural reasons for the industry’s problems of the 1970s. He has also worked as a consultant for the Pacific Gas and Electric Company, co-authoring a management history on the utility’s “ACT-squared” energy-efficiency R&D project. In 1999, he published Power Loss: The Origins of Deregulation and Restructuring in the American Electric Utility System. He continues to publish and speak on policy-related issues dealing with electric power systems, working with engineers, scientists, and policy analysts at Virginia Tech and other universities. In an unusual twist for someone who focuses largely on contemporary policy-oriented concerns, Richard is writing a book on the largely neglected—but relatively successful—efforts to power up farms in the years before the federal government created the Rural Electrification Administration (in 1935). Richard can be contacted by email at electricity@vt.edu.

This event is cosponsored by the Program in the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine. To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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Infrastructure, Art, and Energy. An Afternoon with Richard Hirsh http://ias.umn.edu/2016/02/17/chp/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/02/17/chp/#respond Wed, 17 Feb 2016 19:00:16 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22670 Infrastructure, Art, and Energy

Wednesday, February 17, 2016, 2:00-5:30pm
Location TBD

Free and open to the public

Join us for a reading from Arthur Arent’s 1937 Play​, Power: A Living Newspaper, which discusses the creation of public power in the United States, then on to a guided tour of the University of Minnesota’s SE Steam Plant with Jerome Malmquist​. A rare opportunity to meet with fellow policymakers, academics, and industry leaders for discussion, discovery, and a chance to connect about the ever-shifting role energy infrastructure plays in the lives of individuals and society at large, in a unique and exciting setting.

with Richard Hirsh, professor of History of Technology and Science & Technology Studies at Virginia Tech. Hirsh will also speak on Thursday, Feb 18 on Energy consumption and economic growth: The history (and possible future) of an altered relationship.

This event is sponsored by the IAS Combined Heat and Power Collaborative and the Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs, in collaboration with the Institute on the Environment.

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Physical Computing Hackathon. February 12, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/02/12/hackathon-2-12/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/02/12/hackathon-2-12/#respond Fri, 12 Feb 2016 19:30:32 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22590 Physical Computing and the Internet of Things: Hackathon

Friday, February 12, 2016, 2:30-4:00pm
Northrop 110 (Innovation Lab)

Free and open to the public

2015-10-02 smallerThe Internet of Things (IoT) describes the network and data that emerges from adding physical computing components such as sensors, actuators, and network adapters to everyday objects. This new area of research promises to revolutionize our interaction with the physical world by providing levels of analytics and automation previously reserved for digital domains. The IAS Physical Computing Collaborative hosts weekly “hack” sessions to develop physical computing skills and experiment with technologies like Arduinos, littleBits, and LilyPads. If you are a studentin any major and with any level of experience—you are particularly encouraged to join us!

To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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Exploring Taiko and its Impact on Cultural Identity. February 11, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/02/11/taiko/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/02/11/taiko/#respond Thu, 11 Feb 2016 21:00:46 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22465 Thunder Drums: Exploring Taiko and its Impact on Cultural Identity through Performance, Conversation, and Workshop

Thursday, February 11, 2016
Crosby Seminar Room, 240 Northrop

3:15pm Meet the drums
4:00pm Performance, Conversation, Workshop

Free and open to the public

“Taiko” is the Japanese word for “big drum,” and is now also used in North America to describe a style of group performance derived from traditional Japanese drumming and martial arts-inspired movement. What distinguishes contemporary from traditional Japanese taiko drumming is a focus on the taiko as the primary instrument, as opposed to a background time keeper. Most taiko ensembles tend to combine drums of various sizes and configurations with other Japanese percussion and flutes. Though taiko drums have been in Japan for centuries, the style of taiko best known today has a relatively short history, beginning in 1951 with Daihachi Oguchi (1924-2008) and garnering international attention in the 70s and 80s through groups such as Ondekoza and Kodo. North American taiko initially developed in Japanese-American and Japanese-Canadian communities particularly among the younger Sansei, or third generation, many of whom were searching for ways to connect with their Japanese ancestry. It has since spread beyond Japanese- and Asian-American communities, with particularly strong growth on college campuses.

Join Mu Daiko Artistic Director Jennifer Weir, Mu Daiko artists Susan Tanabe and Michiko Buchanan, and UMN scholars Josephine Lee and Cindy Garcia to examine the cultural, historical, and artistic development and impact of Japanese taiko drumming. Meet the drums and drummers up close at 3:15, enjoy conversation and performance, and stay for a Taiko workshop at 5.

Background information on taiko: Overview and History, Drumming Asian America, Taiko Crash Course.

To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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Physical Computing Hackathon. February 5, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/02/05/hackathon-2-05/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/02/05/hackathon-2-05/#respond Fri, 05 Feb 2016 19:30:23 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22588 Physical Computing and the Internet of Things: Hackathon

Friday, February 5, 2016, 2:30-4:00pm
Northrop 110 (Innovation Lab)

Free and open to the public

2015-10-02 smallerThe Internet of Things (IoT) describes the network and data that emerges from adding physical computing components such as sensors, actuators, and network adapters to everyday objects. This new area of research promises to revolutionize our interaction with the physical world by providing levels of analytics and automation previously reserved for digital domains. The IAS Physical Computing Collaborative hosts weekly “hack” sessions to develop physical computing skills and experiment with technologies like Arduinos, littleBits, and LilyPads. If you are a studentin any major and with any level of experience—you are particularly encouraged to join us!

To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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Brechtian Legacies: Expanded Theater. February 4, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/02/04/brechtian/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/02/04/brechtian/#respond Thu, 04 Feb 2016 21:00:58 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22417 Brechtian Legacies: Expanded Theater

Thursday, February 4, at 4:00pm
Crosby Seminar Room, 240 Northrop

Free and open to the public


Download: audio, small video, or original.

“Showing has to be shown”, Brecht requested from his actors, and it is perhaps possible to define Brechtian theater (if such thing exists) on the whole by reference to this demand. In a lot of Brecht’s plays we find theater-within-theater settings (showing the showing-scenes): Polly’s Pirate Jenny in the Three-Penny-Opera or Paul Ackermann’s escape on a sofa in Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny. Through such scenes Brecht’s theater seeks to determine itself, its limits and moments of failure. This becomes possible because by showing the showing theater ceases to be just performance, but turns into a medium: “it disturbs the stability of the site” (Weber)—of any site—and exposes whatever is going on as made up, as produced, as geared towards an outcome, in short, as a staging, whether inside or outside of Theatre. This specific mediality of theater can be put to various uses; it seems at play, for example, in a variety of recent documentaries, classified as “performing documentaries,” it is employed for therapeutic purposes and for political action.

Theater Expanded/Theatre as Medium: our panel will discuss this particular Brechtian legacy, its epistemological force and potential to initiate social change.
brechtian crop4

Lisa Channer, Theatre Arts & Dance, UMN
Juliette Cherbuliez, French & Italian, UMN
Maria Hofmann, German, Scandinavian and Dutch, UMN
Marc Silberman, German, University of Wisconsin

Moderated by Matthias Rothe (German, Scandinavian and Dutch, UMN).

This event is cosponsored by the Center for German and European Studies, the Departments of Theatre Arts & Dance and German, Scandinavian and Dutch, and by the IAS Collaborative Rehearsing Failure: The Brechtian Moment as part of the spring’s Weill/Brecht Festival. See also: To Embrace Failure? A Multi-disciplinary Re-thinking.

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What it Means to be Educated: Life Histories of Karen Women. http://ias.umn.edu/2016/02/03/yang/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/02/03/yang/#respond Wed, 03 Feb 2016 17:00:38 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22666 What it Means to be Educated:
Life Histories of Karen Women

Wednesday, February 3, 2016, Noon-1:00pm
308 Elmer L. Andersen Library

Free and open to the public

Our understandings of what it means to be educated varies in different sociocultural contexts. This presentation will use life histories to introduce how Karen women negotiate their educational identities in Burma, Thailand, and the United States. In addition, Dr. Maiyia Yang will share her experiences working in refugee resettlement and elaborate on how we can use life histories to help us understand the impact of global migration.

Maiyia Yang is currently a mental health practitioner at Ultimate Health, Inc., where she works with participants in the Adult Rehabilitative Mental Health Services (ARMHS) program. Maiyia received her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development with a minor in Human Rights. In 2010, she was an operations assistant at the International Organization for Migration (IOM) in Thailand to work on the logistics of refugee resettlement. She serves on the board of directors for the Karen Organization of Minnesota, the Hmong Cultural Center, and the Sierra Leone Foundation for New Democracy.

In Fall 2014, Yang was an IAS Grad Fellow though the Office for Equity and Diversity’s Community of Scholars Program.

This talk is sponsored by the Immigration History Research Center and the Institute for Global Studies. To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IHRC (612-625-4800).

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Physical Computing Hackathon. January 29, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/01/29/hackathon-1-29/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/01/29/hackathon-1-29/#respond Fri, 29 Jan 2016 19:30:05 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22585 Physical Computing and the Internet of Things: Hackathon

Friday, January 29, 2016, 2:30-4:00pm
Northrop 240 (Seminar Room)

Free and open to the public

2015-10-02 smallerThe Internet of Things (IoT) describes the network and data that emerges from adding physical computing components such as sensors, actuators, and network adapters to everyday objects. This new area of research promises to revolutionize our interaction with the physical world by providing levels of analytics and automation previously reserved for digital domains. The IAS Physical Computing Collaborative hosts weekly “hack” sessions to develop physical computing skills and experiment with technologies like Arduinos, littleBits, and LilyPads. If you are a studentin any major and with any level of experience—you are particularly encouraged to join us!

To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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The Future of the Meme: #Iranelection, Activism, Social Media. January 28, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/01/28/mottahedeh/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/01/28/mottahedeh/#respond Thu, 28 Jan 2016 21:00:07 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22382 The Future of the Meme:
#Iranelection, Activism, Social Media

Thursday, January 28, at 4:00pm
Crosby Seminar Room, 240 Northrop

Free and open to the public


Download: audio, small video, or original.

A look at the contexts for the first long-trending global hashtag #iranelection reveals the contours of an emerging ecology of social protest in 2009. This talk offers a prehistory, of sorts, to today’s uses of hashtags and trending topics, of selfies and avatar activism, of citizen journalism and memes to evaluate activism in a rapidly shifting arena of online war against #ISIS, police brutality, and corporate greed, and its recoil into #Clicktivism, outrage fatigue and #GriefShaming.

Negar Mottahedeh is a cultural critic and film theorist specializing in interdisciplinary and feminist contributions to the fields of Middle Eastern Studies and Film Studies. She is known for her work on Iranian Cinema, but has also published on the history of reform, revolution and the uses of social media in protest. Her new book #iranelection: Hashtag Solidarity and the Transformation of Online Life (2015 Stanford University Press), follows the protest movement around Iran’s fraudulent presidential election in 2009, to investigate how emerging social media platforms developed international solidarity. The 2009 protests in Iran were the first revolts to be catapulted onto the global stage by social media, just as the 1979 Iranian Revolution was agitated by cassette tapes. #iranelection reveals the new online ecology of social protest and offers a prehistory, of sorts, to the uses of hashtags and trending topics, of selfies and avatar activism, citizen journalism and YouTube mashups.

This talk is cosponsored by the Department of Communication Studies, the Department of Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature, and the Graduate Minor in Moving Image Studies. To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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Physical Computing Hackathon. January 22, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/01/22/hackathon-1-22/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/01/22/hackathon-1-22/#respond Fri, 22 Jan 2016 19:30:47 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22583 Physical Computing and the Internet of Things: Hackathon

Friday, January 22, 2016, 2:30-4:00pm
Northrop 110 (Innovation Lab)

Free and open to the public

2015-10-02 smallerThe Internet of Things (IoT) describes the network and data that emerges from adding physical computing components such as sensors, actuators, and network adapters to everyday objects. This new area of research promises to revolutionize our interaction with the physical world by providing levels of analytics and automation previously reserved for digital domains. The IAS Physical Computing Collaborative hosts weekly “hack” sessions to develop physical computing skills and experiment with technologies like Arduinos, littleBits, and LilyPads. If you are a studentin any major and with any level of experience—you are particularly encouraged to join us!

To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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Thursdays at 4: Season Overview. January 21, 2016 http://ias.umn.edu/2016/01/21/season/ http://ias.umn.edu/2016/01/21/season/#respond Thu, 21 Jan 2016 21:00:39 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22456 Thursdays at 4: Season Overview

Thursday, January 4, 2016, at 4:00pm
Crosby Seminar Room, 240 Northrop

Free and open to the public

braun3In the Thursdays at Four series we feature an eclectic mix of scholars, artists, and practitioners from diverse disciplines who present in a variety of forms, including lecture, discussion, and performance. The spring series will include discussions on The Future of the Meme, Taiko and Cultural Identity, Life and Death in the Bakken Oil Fields, The Analogy Problem in Human Trafficking Reform, and more

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Privatizing Education for the Public Good? Dec. 22, 2015 http://ias.umn.edu/2015/12/22/privatizing/ http://ias.umn.edu/2015/12/22/privatizing/#respond Tue, 22 Dec 2015 20:34:46 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22510 Media Corporations and the ‘Great Equalizer’ in Crisis: Privatizing Education for the Public Good?

by Roozbeh Shirazi and Mary Vavrus

“Vast and overshadowing private fortunes are among the greatest dangers to which the happiness of the people in a republic can be subjected. Such fortunes would create a feudalism of a new kind; but one more oppressive and unrelenting than that of the Middle Ages….Now, surely, nothing but universal education can counterwork [oppose] this tendency to the domination of capital and the servility of labor…Education, then, beyond all other devices of human origin, is the great equalizer of the conditions of men—the balance-wheel of the social machinery.”

Horace Mann, Twelfth Annual Report to the Massachusetts Board of Education 1848

From its inception in the United States, public education has long been envisioned to serve an integral part of a social democratic promise of upward mobility and sociopolitical equality. Despite the long record of racialized exclusion in the US, belief in the emancipatory potential of education has historically fuelled debates and initiatives to desegregate public schools and, more recently, to close “achievement gaps” between white students and students of color. In these efforts, there are echoes of Horace Mann’s call for education to equalize our social conditions, and John Dewey’s admonition that education should not merely constitute preparation for adult life, but instead should play a vital role in the “freeing of individual capacity in a progressive growth directed to social aims.”1 Thus schools have been imagined to be part of the social contract not only because they present a path towards better individual futures, but also because they have the potential to model conditions for social transformation.

Despite the persistent belief in the equalizing power of schooling, it is clear that social conditions are becoming more unequal and precarious in the United States. Research shows that political changes in the in the past three decades have produced a political order closer to oligarchy than democracy in the United States.2 Social mobility in the US—when defined as intergenerational earnings mobility—lags behind the United Kingdom and Nordic countries.3 In top-tier colleges and universities, almost three-quarters of the entering class is from the highest socioeconomic quartile.4 These shifts challenge the narrative of education as a balancing force against social inequity, and raise questions about whether schools can create more equal socioeconomic conditions at a time when such disparities are proliferating.

Changes in the political order and persistent socioeconomic inequalities have brought new scrutiny to the public system of education in the United States. This scrutiny has engendered fierce debates about the “crisis of failing schools.” As a result, schools and school districts have become sites of political contest, and “school reform” a veritable industry. To be clear, the narrative of “crisis in schooling” in the United States is not new, and can be easily traced back (in different permutations) to the post World War II era, if not further. Brown vs. Board of Education, the Sputnik Crisis, Lynden Johnson’s Great Society programs, federally-mandated desegregation, and the Reagan-era report, A Nation at Risk, all represent distinct historical moments that located the solutions to pressing sociopolitical problems in education reform; these and other events have pushed schooling into the forefront of public consciousness and debate.

Our research collaborative, Private for the Public Good?, emerged from an interdisciplinary interest in examining popular media to understand the underlying assumptions driving discourses of education crisis and reform in the United States. Although the fields of communication studies and educational studies share several intellectual commitments—such as seeking understanding of the political economy of knowledge production, as well as how cultural forms and social practices are produced and circulated within and across diverse contexts—there is not an extensive history of interdisciplinary inquiry or dialogue across these fields. Bridging these fields is important, given the great growth in journalistic, documentary film, and entertainment media examining schools and their role in constructing our society.

We wanted to know what (if any) forms of citizenship media depictions of educational crisis encourage, and how media contribute to the discourse of educational crisis in the United States. In particular, we were interested in looking at how market-driven solutions, such as promoting educational choice and accountability-driven reform, have been expressed through media representations that focus on public education. Additionally, we were curious to know how the obstacles to school reform and improvement were identified and framed in these same treatments. Over the course of our meetings, we compiled an archive of public service announcements, news coverage, and film and television treatments of public education in the United States. Our primary analysis was limited to four films and documentaries about educational crisis in the US that we screened and discussed in Summer 2015:

  • Waiting for Superman (2010)
  • Won’t Back Down (2012)
  • The Inconvenient Truth Behind Waiting for Superman (2011)
  • Race to Nowhere (2010)

These films are part of a recent wave of film around educational crisis in the United States, and they address questions of policy, pedagogy, educational choice, and equity in their treatments of the American public educational system. The films varied considerably in their depictions of educational crisis: Race to Nowhere, for example, is a documentary focused primarily upon the mental wellbeing of youth and how today’s schools, driven by accountability-based reform and high stakes testing, have routinized stress for children and negatively impacted families and conceptions of childhood. The educator and parent-produced documentary, The Inconvenient Truth Behind Waiting for Superman, challenges the vilification of teachers unions as an impediment to greater educational equity, and the uncritical assessment of charter schools as an obvious solution for challenges confronting public schools. The film features many educators and parents in the New York City public schools, and also marshals policy analysis and research to challenge the idea of “failing schools” and other claims made in Waiting for Superman. The argumentative technique is to make as strong of a data-driven, empirical critique of market-driven education reform as possible in an hour, which may leave the viewer inundated with (relevant) information, but not necessarily feeling more informed.

In contrast, Waiting for Superman focused on a smaller number of youth and their families, and tells the story of educational crisis through their experiences of schooling. The climax of the film is a suspenseful montage of charter school lotteries, in which some of the focal students are chosen to go to their desired schools, while others are passed over. The lottery scene and its emotional aftermath are the linchpin for the film’s argument: a high-quality education should be a matter of choice, not socioeconomic status or luck. Finally, Won’t Back Down presents a dramatization of school reform events in Pittsburgh. Like Waiting for Superman, this film relied on channeling affect—rather than marshaling empirical data—to drive home its message and encourage viewers to align themselves with its premise. It features Maggie Gynllenhall as the unpolished but irrepressible working class mom who is willing to battle the three headed monster of bad teachers, unresponsive administrators, and powerful unions to secure a good education for her daughter. Won’t Back Down also draws on an extended school lottery scene to highlight the “unfairness” of the current system and the need for greater school choice.

These films expressed similar critiques of public education “failing” poor students and students of color, while depicting educational choice, and charter schools in particular, as an underutilized solution to address classed and racialized educational achievement gaps. Both films aim to incite an emotional response or engagement with the crisis of public education, rather than empirically comparing the performance and constraints of charter schools versus traditional public schools. Moreover, they frame opportunities for action in particular ways, namely, public school “failure” (often evidenced by standardized test scores) is a window of opportunity for advocating for greater school choice; each film advances the notion that competition in the educational sector will create better educational outcomes, encouraging parents and community members to take a role in creating this change. The similarity between these films was unsurprising in retrospect, as they had a production company in common–Walden Media—and what they fail to explore are ways in which our systems of educational governance, accountability and assessment can be strengthened or renewed beyond such choice-based approaches.

Given the ties between the two films, it was important to members of our collaborative to not only attend to representational strategies of crisis, but also to situate these media representations within a larger analysis of the political economy of market-driven approaches to education reform and media corporations. Because many of us were aware of problematic social consequences stemming from the commercial basis of the US media system,5 we began to examine ties between corporate education reform organizations and the media outlets associated with them. Not surprisingly, we found a number of individuals and education reform organizations with ties to media corporations. For example, former CNN and NBC anchor Campbell Brown founded and sits of the board of directors of the pro-charter school, education reform non-profit The Partnership for Educational Justice; last summer Campbell launched The Seventy Four, an education reform news site that employs other well-connected journalists formerly employed by mainstream outlets such as Time magazine, and is premised on the assertion that “the education system needs fixing.”6 Fixes associated with Campbell’s project include promoting charter schools and eliminating teachers unions, but she is not alone in parlaying her professional connections into a corporate education reform media campaign: the Los Angeles Times recently announced its partnership with various foundations including the Baxter Family, Broad, and Wasserman Foundations to fund its Education Matters program. Education Matters purports to produce “independent journalism” around K-12 education issues in Los Angeles and across the United States, yet its funding foundations promote corporate, “market-driven” education reform7–a situation that both casts doubts on the ability of reporters to operate independently and illuminates yet another media corporation with financial ties to corporate education reformers.

Such links between corporate media and corporate education reform are multiplying in number and tenacity, part of a troubling media trend begun in the 1980s when the Reagan administration began deregulating various industries—media among them. Since this time, media corporations’ size, profitability, and importance to the U.S. economy have all steadily increased; at the same time their commitment to serving the public interest has diminished considerably,8 despite that being a requirement for receiving and maintaining a license to broadcast over the airwaves. In the United States, the broadcast airwaves have the status of being a public good, understood as necessary for ready access to information about our communities, country, and world—information that we need in order to be fully functioning citizens. Media deregulation has also eroded the Federal Communication Commission’s (the media and telecommunication regulatory agency in the US) mandate to uphold the public interest in its policy-making and enforcement. These shifts in the media environment over the last 30-plus years have been described by Robert McChesney as anti-democratic because they have “undermined the media system’s ability to serve democratic values and practices; it cannot serve two gods.”9 McChesney has chronicled the impacts of such media privatization on democratic governance and journalism; these mutually constitutive practices are increasingly driven by commercial imperatives such as the requirement that news organizations, like their non-news media counterparts, maximize profit and deliver dividends to their shareholders. Among other problems, this has led to news media shying away from reporting that critiques corporate capitalism or that asks whether it is appropriate to foist commercial values and practices on non-commercial institutions.

That corporations represent the ideal organizational structure has thus become an article of faith in news reports on a variety of public institutions; public schools are no exception. The notion that students would benefit if their schools were “run like a business,” for example, has been trumpeted widely across news reports about higher education.10 Reporting on the K-12 system exhibits a similar deference to privatization and other projects promoted by corporate education reformers.11 Economist Richard Wolff notes that such uncritical acceptance of a corporate model of operations appears in media coverage of public institutions generally, reporters failing to point out problematic aspects of the corporate model. What’s more, Wolff points out that reporters typically do not venture out of this frame to acknowledge the many benefits associated with public, non-profit organizations, including educational institutions. Thus, we do not hear of reporters asking whether a failed business or industry should be “run like a school,” despite many public school systems having clearly successful track records that stand in contrast to those of failed industries.12

McChesney reminds us that “an informed citizenry is the foundation of democracy, and there is no route to such an outcome that does not require a strong news media system and a healthy system of public education.”13 The growing integration of public goods into the private sector, like airwaves and school systems, thus raises questions about the nature of our public institutions and the rising influence of private actors over them. What is “public” about public goods? Which publics are our institutions accountable to, and which publics have access and influence over our institutions?

In thinking about the future of public education, such questions are not merely academic semantics: they connect to more recent struggles to reclaim public spaces and institutions from the encroachment of private interests and market driven approaches to administration and reform. There are growing grassroots efforts to support student and family rights to “opt out” of standardized testing in US K-12 education.14 As part of our research collaborative, we invited noted education policy scholar, Dr. Julian Vasquez Heilig—along with University faculty and students, public school administrators, teachers, and community organizers—to participate in a discussion of community-based approaches to education reform.

At the postsecondary level, related questions of the transformation of the public good and encroachment of private interests at public institutions are being debated. Several universities have recently witnessed large demonstrations against the administrators who come from corporate business backgrounds. At the University of Iowa, several hundred demonstrators protested the Iowa Board of Regents Meeting to present more than 1000 signatures calling for the dismissal of Bruce Harreld who became university president despite no previous experience in higher education and a career spent at IBM.15
At the University of Missouri, former President Timothy Wolfe (who also came to higher education from a corporate background and stint in the computer business) and Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin resigned after a wave of protests highlighted administrative indifference to on-campus racism, and the elimination of graduate student health care as a cost cutting measure.16 On our own campus, we have seen the emergence of student-led movements calling for more substantive engagements and greater inclusion of marginalized voices with issues of equity and diversity at the institution. At the University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign, the University’s chancellor, Phyllis Wise, resigned over being implicated in a scandal over hidden emails from donors and alumni involving the rescinding of the academic appointment of Steven Salaita, a Palestinian American scholar of American Indian Studies.17 The rescinded offer resulted in large campus protests and nationwide campaigns calling for censure of UIUC for abandoning the principle of academic freedom and for Salaita’s reinstatement,18 culminating in a legal settlement of the case resulting in UIUC paying Salaita $875000.19 These incidents, while different in aims and context, nevertheless draw our attention to localized resistance and critique of the existing paradigm of market-driven reform and management of public educational institutions. Moreover, all of these moments and events lead us to question, to whom do our institutions belong? What are our public values around education?

At the University of Minnesota, a landgrant institution, our mission is to “promote access to higher education and collaborating to advance knowledge benefiting communities, the state, and world.”20 Though our mission resonates with the vision set forth by Horace Mann nearly two centuries ago, we are asked to do this work at a time when higher education is increasingly assessed as a service or product, and amid growing pressures to be more efficient and competitive despite diminishing state support. The friction produced by these seemingly contradictory mandates is increasingly evident both on and beyond our campus, as students, staff, and faculty are mobilizing to call into question who benefits from institutional policies, how educational institutions carry out their “public” mandates, and how responsive they are to their increasingly diverse publics.

Our research collaborative began when a group of faculty from across disciplines and academic units at the University expressed interest in understanding how depictions of “crisis” are used to leverage change in educational systems. Along the way, we saw how our questions have implications beyond research, and speak to ongoing social and political contests that are unfolding across school districts and university campuses around the country. It is increasingly clear that asking what is the purpose of education and how it contributes to the public good should not be a conversation to be had solely by policymakers, a narrow stratum of reformers, media corporations, or educational administrators. If the events we have discussed are any indicator of the urgency of this discussion, then it is clear that these questions have captured our collective imagination, and that there is still much more work to do if public education is to be the great equalizer.

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1 John Dewey. (1916). Democracy and Education. New York: The Free Press. p.98
2 Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page. (2014). Testing theories of American politics: Elites, interest groups, and average citizens. Perspectives on Politics 12(3). 564-581.
3 Markus Jantti et. al. (2006). American Exceptionalism in a New Light: A Comparison of Intergenerational Earnings Mobility in the Nordic Countries, the United Kingdom and the United States. Discussion Paper Series. Institute for the Study of Labor.
4 Robert Haveman and Timothy Smeeding. (2006). The Role of Higher Education
in Social Mobility.
5 For example, see Robert W. McChesney (2015). Rich Media, Poor Democracy: Communication Politics in Dubious Times. New York: The New Press.
6 Eileen Daspin. (13 July 2015). Why This Controversial Former CNN Host is Launching an Education News Site. Fortune. Retrieved from http://fortune.com/2015/07/13/why-this-controversial-former-cnn-host-is-launching-an-education-news-site/
7 Molly Knefel. (24 August 2015). LA Times’ ‘Independent’ Education Project Bankrolled by Charter School Backers. Extra! Retrieved from http://fair.org/home/la-times-independent-education-project-bankrolled-by-charter-school-backers/
8 Ben Bagdikian. (2004). The New Media Monopoly. Boston: Beacon Press.
9 McChesney, p. xxxvii.
10 See Henry A. Giroux (2014). Neoliberalism’s War on Higher Education. Chicago: Haymarket Books.
11 See, for example, David C. Berliner & Gene V. Glass and Associates (2014). 50 Myths & Lies That Threaten America’s Public Schools: The Real Crisis in Education. New York: Teachers College Press.
12 Richard Wolff (15 November 2015). Economic Update: Economic Power Struggles. Podcast. Retrieved from http://rdwolff.com/content/economic-update-economic-power-struggles
13 McChesney, p. lv
14 See http://unitedoptout.com/
15 See Jeff Charis-Carlson. (22, October, 2015). “Hundreds protest regents, call for Harreld to resign.” Iowa City Press-Citizen.
http://www.press-citizen.com/story/news/education/university-of-iowa/2015/10/21/hundreds-protest-regents-call-harreld-resign/74355180/
16 See Dana Ford. (10. November 2015). “Jonathan Butler: Meet the man whose hunger strike flipped the script at Mizzou.” CNN. Retrieved from http://www.cnn.com/2015/11/09/us/jonathan-butler-hunger-strike-missouri-profile/
17 See Haaretz. (25 August, 2015). University of Illinos Officers: Reinstate Prof. Who Lost Job Offer Over anti-Israel Tweets. Retrieved from http://www.haaretz.com/world-news/1.672945
18 See Ali Abunimah (11, September ,2014). Univ. of Illinois top officials challenged on pro-Israel donor’s role in Salaita firing. Electronic Intifada. Retrieved from https://electronicintifada.net/blogs/ali-abunimah/watch-univ-illinois-top-officials-challenged-pro-israel-donors-role-salaita
19 See Jodi S. Cohen. (12 November 2015). University of Illinois OKs $875,000 settlement to end Steven Salaita dispute. Chicago Tribune http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-steven-salaita-settlement-met-20151112-story.html
20 See http://landgrant150.umn.edu/

PDF version of this article.

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Henry Buchwald, Bariatric Surgeon http://ias.umn.edu/2015/12/15/henry-buchwald/ http://ias.umn.edu/2015/12/15/henry-buchwald/#respond Tue, 15 Dec 2015 22:54:41 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22531
Download: audio, small video, or original.

Henry Buchwald is Professor of Surgery and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Minnesota. During his more than 50 years at the University of Minnesota, Buchwald has been a surgeon, teacher, mentor, researcher, and inventor. He was the first Owen H. and Sarah Davidson Wangensteen Chair in Experimental Surgery from 2001-2004 and holds the post as Emeritus. His long-term research interests include cholesterol and atherosclerosis, obesity surgery, implantable devices, hyperlipidemias, and measurement of blood oxygen transport. Early in his career, he discovered that the part of the small intestine called the ileum is the primary site for the absorption or cholesterol and bile acids (the primary end-products of cholesterol metabolism), and, that performing surgery—Buchwald’s partial ileal bypass surgery, a procedure that bypasses part of the ileum—lowers cholesterol levels and dramatically improves the lives of those with familial hypercholesterolemia.

Buchwald trained with Richard Varco who performed the first obesity surgery in 1953. Since 1966, Buchwald has performed more than 4,000 obesity surgeries (also known as bariatric surgeries) and become one of the most influential and innovative surgeons in the field. Throughout his career as a general surgeon, Buchwald has performed many thousands of surgeries, including all open gastrointestinal surgeries, partial ileal bypasses, jejunoileal bypasses, gastric bypasses, Fobi Pouch, vertical banded gastroplasty, roux-en-y bypasses, and duodenal switches.

His writing and influence also go into the realm of biomedical ethics and insurance reform. He has been president of the Central Surgical Association (1997–1998), the American Society of Bariatric Surgery (1998-1999), and the International Federation of Surgery for Obesity (2003-2004). He is coeditor of the journal, Obesity Surgery. He is a Fellow of the American Surgical Association, American College of Surgeons, Central Surgical Association, Cardiovascular Surgery Council and Epidemiology Council of the American Heart Association, and International College of Surgeons.

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Cathy Jordan, Professor of Pediatrics. December 2015 http://ias.umn.edu/2015/12/14/jordan/ http://ias.umn.edu/2015/12/14/jordan/#respond Mon, 14 Dec 2015 21:29:25 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22645
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Cathy Jordan, PhD, LP, pediatric neuropsychologist by training, is an associate professor in the Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Minnesota. She is also an Extension Specialist in the University of Minnesota Extension Center for Community Vitality. Cathy was the Executive Director of the University of Minnesota Extension’s Children, Youth and Family Consortium from 2004 until July, 2014. Cathy earned her PhD in clinical psychology from Wayne State University in 1991.

Cathy has two primary areas of focus – 1) community-engaged scholarship, and 2) nature-based education and other outdoor experiences for youth at risk for academic disengagement.

Cathy’s early research endeavors concentrated on two large, longitudinal, federally-funded Community-based Participatory Research (CBPR) projects beginning in the 1990’s on lead poisoning prevention and the developmental effects of lead. Later projects evaluated the effectiveness of a coordinated social service and healthy housing service delivery model and tested the impact of a culturally-specific, comprehensive asthma prevention model and its impact on educational outcomes.

Cathy’s interests in nature’s impact on youth is more recent. Cathy is working with Wilderness Inquiry (WI) in Minneapolis to develop a research agenda that will document the developmental impact of outdoor place-based education on urban youth. Cathy is also working with the national organization Children and Nature Network to create a robust repository for vetted scientific literature on best and promising practices in, and the impact of, connecting children to nature.

Prof. Jordan spoke in a discussion on The 21st Century Engaged Public Research University in Fall 2015.

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An Afternoon with PerFarmance Project. December 12, 2015 http://ias.umn.edu/2015/12/12/perfarmance/ http://ias.umn.edu/2015/12/12/perfarmance/#respond Sat, 12 Dec 2015 19:00:12 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22392 An Afternoon with PerFarmance Project

Saturday, December 12, 2:00-5:00pm
Rarig Center Xperimental Theatre

Free and open to the public

perfarmance
Are you interested in learning more about agricultural practices in Minnesota? How about community-based theatre methodology? If so, then please join Chris Bell (PhD Student – Theatre Historiography) on Saturday December 12th between 2:00-5:00 at Rarig Center’s Xperimental Theatre for ​An Afternoon with PerFarmance Project​. The event that will share ​PerFarmance Project​’s work in Cloneen, Ireland and Lac qui Parle County, Minnesota.

2:00-2:15​ – Doors Open – ​What is PerFarmance Project?
2:15-3:00​ – Mapping Workshop
3:00-3:45​ – Q&A with Lac qui Parle County Farmers
3:45-4:00​ – Introduction to Screening (Chris Bell and Juan Aldape)
4:00-5:00​ – Screening of ​PerFarmance Project – Lac qui Parle County

Please feel free to come and go as your schedule permits!

This event is organized by the IAS Environmental Humanities Collaborative.

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What is/was a book? Some answers from the Romantic period. December 10, 2015 http://ias.umn.edu/2015/12/10/lynch/ http://ias.umn.edu/2015/12/10/lynch/#respond Thu, 10 Dec 2015 21:00:16 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=21760 What is/was a book?
Some answers from the Romantic period

Thursday, December 10, 2015, at 4:00pm
Crosby Seminar Room, 2nd Floor East Side, 240 Northrop

Free and open to the public

lynch books crop

Download: audio, small video, or original.

Nearly two decades ago William Paulson declared that “electronically stored and retrieved text, in comparison with its printed predecessor, is almost infinitely malleable and labile”; his contrast between the digital text’s openness to “modification and recontextualization” and “the stasis of cold print” has subsequently become a commonplace. I want to complicate this familiar before/after contrast between a print and a digital age. This paper surveys the multitude of ways in which bookish people in the early nineteenth century traded on the fissiparousness of the codex form. Considering published sources and unpublished (manuscript albums and extra-illustrated books), it recovers an earlier culture’s surprising readiness to conceptualize texts and images, poems and pictures as detachable and re-attachable slips and scraps.

Deidre Shauna Lynch was educated at the University of British Columbia in Canada and at Stanford University, where she took her Ph.D. Formerly Chancellor Jackman Professor in the Department of English at the University of Toronto, she joined the faculty of Harvard University in 2014. She has published widely on the literature and culture of late- eighteenth-century and early-nineteenth-century Britain, on the history of women’s writing, on the theory and history of the novel, and on the history of reading. Her first book The Economy of Character: Novels, Market Culture and the Business of Inner Meaning won the Modern Language Association Prize for a First Book in 1999. Other books include (as editor or co-editor) Cultural Institutions of the Novel (Duke University Press), Janeites: Austen’s Disciples and Devotees (Princeton University Press), the Oxford World’s Classics edition of Jane Austen’s Persuasion, the Norton Critical Edition of Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, and the Romantic Period volume of The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Her edition of Austen’s Mansfield Park will be published by Harvard University Press in 2016. In early 2015 the University of Chicago Press published her Loving Literature: A Cultural History, a study that engages the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century prehistory of English studies in order to give a new account of the state of the discipline and of the state of our literary affections. Lynch has won multiple teaching awards, including the Northeast Association of Graduate Schools Graduate Faculty Teaching Award.

This event is cosponsored by the Department of English. To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event.

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Info Session on IAS Collaborative Applications. December 8, 2015 http://ias.umn.edu/2015/12/08/collab-info-2015-2/ http://ias.umn.edu/2015/12/08/collab-info-2015-2/#respond Tue, 08 Dec 2015 17:00:49 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22347 >Mon, Dec 7, St. Paul Campus Credit: Jan Estep Each year, the Institute supports a limited number of research/creative collaboratives. These collaboratives promote synergistic interdisciplinary activity that can be challenging within departmental structures. Collaborative activities vary: some collaboratives […]]]> Info Sessions on IAS Research and Creative Collaboratives

Tuesday, December 8, 12-1:30pm
Crosby Seminar Room, 240 Northrop


Credit: Jan Estep
Each year, the Institute supports a limited number of research/creative collaboratives. These collaboratives promote synergistic interdisciplinary activity that can be challenging within departmental structures. Collaborative activities vary: some collaboratives meet regularly for works-in-progress discussions or public workshops and other programs, others work together on projects or convene reading groups. Some collaboratives incorporate a public component that encourages connections with the community. The Institute seeks participation from all colleges, schools, and campuses at the University and encourages student participation in collaboratives. Collaboratives may be convened by University faculty, students, or staff and may include non-University community members, but should show evidence of faculty participation.

At this session we will answer questions about the collaboratives program, discuss what constitutes a good application, demonstrate the online application system, and answer your questions. Beverages will be provided — please feel free to bring your lunch.

To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact the IAS (ias@umn.edu 612-626-5054) at least two weeks prior to the event. This event is free and open to the public.

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How Anthropology (and the other Social Sciences) Help Business Do Better http://ias.umn.edu/2015/12/07/epic/ http://ias.umn.edu/2015/12/07/epic/#respond Mon, 07 Dec 2015 21:00:25 +0000 http://ias.umn.edu/?p=22420 How Anthropology (and the other Social Sciences) Help Business Do Better

Monday, December 7, 2015 at 4:00pm
Carlson School of Management 2-213

Free and open to the public. Reception follows.

epic product designThe executive board of EPIC (the Ethnographic Praxis in Industry Conference) will be visiting the University of Minnesota from December 7-9 to plan EPIC, which will be held from August 29-September 1, 2016. They have kindly agreed to present a forum for the University on the topic of How Anthropology (and the other Social Sciences) Help Business Do Better. The board consists of:

Ken Anderson, Principal Researcher, Intel Corporation
Maria Bezaitis, Principal Engineer, Intel Corporation
Alexandra Mack, Research Fellow, Pitney Bowes Strategic Technology and Innovation Center

The board members all have graduate degrees in anthropology and use ethnographic research as part of their work. All are published researchers in professional anthropology publications. They will discuss their work and answer questions about careers and applications for social scientists and ethnographically oriented designers and engineers (including B.A. and B.S. degree holders). Please mark your calendars for this exciting event.

You can learn more about EPIC at epicpeople.org where there is a professional roster of companies who are oriented toward social science research as well as a job board.

This forum is co-sponsored by the Department of Anthropology and the IAS Collaborative on Social Science and Product Design.

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