University of Minnesota
University of Minnesota
http://www.umn.edu/
612-625-5000

Thursdays at Four features an eclectic mix of scholars, artists, and practitioners. We aim to put ideas in unexpected juxtaposition with one another to lure you to experience something which might lie a bit out of your ordinary range of interests, to think about new topics or old topics in new ways. Join us Thursday afternoons at 4 p.m., usually in Nolte Center 125.

November 14

November 14

November 21

November 21 RCR

December 5

December 5 RCR

September 12
September 19
September 26

October 3
October 10
October 17
October 24
October 31

November 7
November 14
November 21

December 5

November 14

November 14

Paul, Pagans and the Redemption of Israel
The Roetzel Family Lecture by Paula Fredriksen, Visiting Professor of Comparative Religion at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.  ROOM CHANGE to Bell Museum theater.  Reception in Nolte Lounge.

November 21

November 21

Digital Storytelling in Higher Education
IAS Collaborative Digital Storytelling: First-person narratives as multimedia presentations. Creators of digital stories make sense of the world through inquiry, self-reflection and perspective-taking. Through a process that is out of necessity audience-centered and cooperative, digital storytelling promotes development of the self, civic engagement, deeper engagement with course content, and engagement with technology in more sophisticated ways.

December 5

December 5

Sawyer Seminar
“Making the Mississippi: Formulating new water narratives for the 21st century and beyond.”  The 2014-15 Sawyer Seminar will develop a new intellectual framework and supporting narratives to theorize new ways of thinking about water systems.

 

9.12.13 RK_Unspoken credit in flyer

September 12

Unspoken – panel discussion
The conflict between the will to deny horrible events and the will to proclaim them operates in our bodies, our minds, and in our societies. Artist and UMN professor Rebecca Krinke explores this dilemma with five distinguished scholars.
fromspacetoplace
September 19
From Space to Place – panel discussion
From Space to Place: an exhibition and platform for reexamining place and one’s relationship to it.  Exhibition curators Teréz Iacovino and Artemis Hansen, artist Caroline Kent and Nash Gallery director Howard Oransky.
Anita Daimant
September 26

Women in Religious Texts and Contexts – panel discussion
Who were the women of sacred stories and histories?  Three authors discuss fiction, religious texts and the biographical novel with UM Morris professor Michael Lackey.

20131003 Gayle Morrison Hogs Exit 260x420

October 3

Gayle Morrison “Oral History: Opening the Kitchen Door”
Gayle Morrison discusses her latest work, Hog’s Exit: Jerry Daniels, the Hmong, and the CIA. This keynote opens the “Hmong Across Borders” Conference, October 4-5.

October 10

October 10

Kirill Thompson Yan Fu: Between Tradition and Modernity
Kirill Thompson discusses Yan Fu, a classical scholar who translated Victorian texts into Classical Chinese, notably works by Smith, Darwin, Spencer, Mill, Huxley, etc., who used Daoism in introducing their ideas to Chinese readers.  Revisiting Daoism through these texts Yan Fu returned to Daoism as an important intellectual resource for china.

October 17

October 17

The New Northrop – panel discussion
A roundtable discussion on the physical and intellectual revitalization of Northrop, an architectural treasure, an enduring symbol of the University, the focal point of the Twin Cities campus, and the anchor of the Northrop Mall since 1929.

October 24

October 24

Food Day
Interactive mapping of ways of understanding and exploring food on campus. Exploring and translating between different “knowledge terrains” that shape the way we know what we know about food, this journey begins with 2:30 pm tours of various details of the campus food map at various locations and end at the IAS.

October 31

October 31

Diyah Larasati and Dag Yngvesson “The Poetics of Labor: Citizenship and Invisibility”
This experimental documentary film will trace the challenges facing Indonesian immigrants to Philadelphia, engaging with and translating their experiences  into cinematic discourse, as they navigate the post-9/11 terrain of “illegality,” and negotiate conflicts within their own community. The project is also an attempt to reflect on ethnography and filmmaking as constantly, historically developing practices with their own inherent paradoxes and underlying dependencies on economies of imagery, sound, information and theory.

November 7

November 7

Roland Fletcher LiDAR, Water, and the Demise of Greater Angkor
Mapping of vast archaeological sites such as Angkor, Cambodia, buried for centuries and shrouded in thick tropical vegetation, used to take decades of painstaking survey work to complete. Now, with airborne laser technology known as LiDAR, data for such maps can be collected in days by illuminating a target with a laser and analyzing the reflected light. The 2012 LiDAR survey of Angkor has given scientists fundamental new insights into the water crises of the 13th to 16th centuries, originally revealed at Angkor by a combination of dendrochronology and excavation.