University of Minnesota
University of Minnesota
http://www.umn.edu/
612-625-5000

November 14 & 15, 2013: Crisis Economics Workshop

“Crisis Economics”: a workshop to examine our socioeconomic and our epistemic crises beyond mainstream academic models and concepts.

Thursday, November 14

Panel I:  The Recent Crisis and What it Means for the Discipline of Economics and Related Disciplines

Introduction to the Workshop by Vinay Gidwani


Available for download as audio, podcast video, or original.

Drucilla Barker


Available for download as audio, podcast video, or original.

Geoff Mann


Available for download as audio, podcast video, or original.

Julia Elyachar


Available for download as audio, podcast video, or original.

Discussants: Bianet Castellanos and Michael Goldman


Available for download as audio, podcast video, or original.

Discussion with Barker, Mann, Elyachar, Castellanos, and Goldman


Available for download as audio, podcast video, or original.

Friday, November 15

Panel II: What is new About Contemporary Capitalism and how is it Transforming the Conditions of Human Life?

Recap of Panel 1, followed by Devin Fergus


Available for download as audio, podcast video, or original.

Julie Chu’s presentation was not recorded.

Discussants: David Karjanen and Karen Ho


Available for download as audio, podcast video, or original.

Discussion with Fergus, Chu, Karjanen, and Ho


Available for download as audio, podcast video, or original.

Open Discussion: What’s Next?


Available for download as audio, podcast video, or original.

Many social critics are calling the first decade of the 21st century a “lost decade,” where incomes and wealth stagnated, indebtedness exponentially grew, and inequality between the 1% and the 99% touched levels not seen since the Great Depression. The current organization of our economy is so overwhelmingly skewed towards the wealthy that it begs the question of how we can imagine a collective future that will secure the wellbeing of all rather than just the select few. We seem to lurch from one economic upheaval to another with unsettling frequency. Most recently, the Great Recession of 2007 has left in its wake human wreckage of tragic proportions. It has fundamentally transformed the collective psyche of people, their relationships to debt, home, education, work, and pleasure, and the political landscape they inhabit. One striking conundrum is why the powerful discipline of economics has been so poor, with few notable exceptions, at confronting recurrent crises and their dynamics: not only in how it theorizes the workings of the economy but also how it attends to the human toll of recessions. This workshop begins a conversation, asking how we can create democratic forms of knowledge production and social arrangements that will advance economic justice and equality.

11.14 Drucilla Barker

11.14 Geoff Mann

11.14 Julia Elyachar

11.14 Fergus Devin Crisis Economics Workshop

September 30th, 2011 (day 13) —The day's schedule of events posted in the central media center, spreading the message of the movement.

11.14 Julie Chu

Context

The workshop on “Crisis Economics” is the culmination of an IAS research collaborative by the same name that ran at University of Minnesota in AY 2012-13. “Crisis Economics” operates from the premise that we inhabit a moment of crisis that is, at once, a socioeconomic crisis that has exacted a steep human toll and an epistemic crisis, where the self-assigned guardian of the economy, the discipline of economics, has proven abjectly inadequate or unable to anticipate, prevent, and diagnose this crisis. While there are different opinions about what ails mainstream economics, only diehard defenders of the discipline will claim that it is healthy. We approach the crisis as a moment of opportunity to rethink the nature of the capitalist economy today, what disciplinary economics teaches (and does not teach) about the workings and dynamics of the economy at institutions of higher education, to foreground heterodox approaches to the economy that have been sidelined by the discipline’s mainstream, and to reinvent pedagogy about the economy within the university and beyond. The collaborative and, now, this capstone workshop aim to rethink economics as embedded in society, and to query the extent to which standard disciplinary approaches to economy are “in crisis” because of their failure to anticipate, prevent, and apprehend recurrent crises. In other words, “crisis economics” is a double entendre that conveys, both, our understanding of the inadequacy of mainstream academic models and concepts, as well as the exigency of engaging with and being responsive to the “real” crises occurring in economy and society.

“Crisis Economics” is an IAS inter-disciplinary research collaborative co-organized by Karen Ho (Anthropology) and Vinay Gidwani (Geography). The purpose of this collaborative is to simultaneously examine our socioeconomic crisis that has exacted a steep human toll and our epistemic crisis, where the self-assigned guardian of the economy, the discipline of economics, has proven unequipped to anticipate, prevent, and diagnose this crisis.

Format

1. We request panelists to pre-circulate papers (preferably unpublished or work-in-progress, but it could also be a recently published work, from 20-40 pages in length) no later than October 31, 2013. Ideally, these papers should provide a sense of the panelists’ larger scholarship. Papers will be hosted on a password-protected webpage open to participants who have registered for the workshop (registration is free); and all participants are asked to read the panelists’ papers prior to the actual event. Although the event is open to members of the public, we expect participants primarily from an interdisciplinary group of faculty and graduate students at the University of Minnesota.

2. The workshop is organized around two main panels, with ample time for discussion. Each panel will feature at least two main speakers, with each panelist presenting their work for 30 – 35 minutes. In their presentations, individual panelists are encouraged to evoke themes that intersect with those of their fellow panelist. Panel presentations will be followed by short commentaries (lasting no more than 10 minutes each) from two discussants per panel. The last hour of each panel will be devoted to discussion involving all workshop participants, including the panelists and discussants.

Schedule

Thursday, November 14th

12:00 noon: Light lunch and snacks will be available

12:15pm: Panel I – The Recent Crisis and What it Means for the Discipline of Economics and Related Disciplines
Drucilla Barker, Women’s and Gender Studies, University of South Carolina, and Founding Member, International Association for Feminist Economics
Geoff Mann, Geography, Simon Fraser University, and Director, Centre for Global Political Economy
Julia Elyachar, Anthropology, University of California-Irvine, joins discussions via video-link, schedule permitting

2:00pm: Coffee Break

2:15pm – 3:15pm: Conclusion of Panel I

Friday, November 15th

8:30am: Continental breakfast

9:00am – Noon: Panel II – What’s New About Contemporary Capitalism and How is it Transforming Human Lives?
Devin Fergus, African American and African Studies, The Ohio State University, and Senior Fellow, Demos Institute
Julie Y. Chu, Anthropology, University of Chicago

12:15pm – 1:30pm: Lunch and thinking about (research, teaching, activist) collaborations going forward

Links to Pre-circulated Papers
Co-Sponsors

Cosponsored by American Studies, Anthropology, Geography, History, Sociology Departments; Global Studies and Humphrey Institutes

Related Links
11.14 Karen Ho

Collaborative convener Karen Ho and the IAS

2013.11.14 crisis economics Vinay Gidwani

Collaborative convener Vinay Gidwani and the IAS

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