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April 22, 2013: Deep Maps, Emergent Realities: the Promise of Spatial Humanities

4.22.13 Bodenhamer

Deep Maps, Emergent Realities: the Promise of Spatial Humanities, a talk by David J. Bodenhamer, The Polis Center, Indiana University-Purdue University
Organized by the IAS Digital Humanities 2.0 Collaborative


Download: audio, small video, or original.

Q&A

Download: audio, small video, or original.

New technologies such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) have facilitated the (re)discovery of space for humanists. Yet until recently GIS has had only limited ability to move us beyond a map of geographical space into a richer, more evocative concepts of place based on history and memory. Over the past few years, GIScientists have made advances in spatial multi-media, in GIS-enabled web services, geo-visualization, cyber geography, and virtual reality that provide capabilities far exceeding the abilities of GIS on its own. This presentation will explore how the convergence of technologies, including but not limited to GIS, has led to the development of a new multi-dimensional and multi-disciplinary approach known as spatial humanities. This convergence of technologies promises to revolutionize the role of place in the digital humanities by allowing us to move far beyond the static map, to shift from two dimensions to multidimensional representations, to develop interactive systems, and to explore space and place dynamically—in effect, to create virtual worlds embodying what we know about space and place. The result may be termed “deep mapping,” a process and platform that enables an exploration of multiple perspectives and deep contingencies over various spatial and temporal scales. The deep map is more suited to the needs of humanists because it does not force disciplinary methods into a narrow or predefined technical framework but instead bends spatial technologies toward the needs of humanists.

David J. Bodenhamer is a professor and director at the IUPU and co-editor of the International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing and Spatial Humanities Series.

Organized by the DH2.0 Collaborative and co-sponsored by U-Spatial.

Suggested Reading

Bodenhamer DJ (2010) The Potential of Spatial Humanities. In: Bodenhamer DJ, Corrigan J, and Harris TM (eds) The Spatial Humanities: GIS and the Future of Humanities Scholarship, Bloonington, IN: Indiana University Press, 14-30.

Bol PK (2011) What do humanists want? What do humanists need? What might humanists get?
In: Dear M, Ketchum J, Luria S, and Richardson D (eds) GeoHumanities: Art, History, Text at the Edge of Place. New York: Routledge, 296-308.

Griffiths S (2013) GIS and Research into Historical “Spaces of Practice”: Overcoming the Epistemological Barriers. In: von Lunen A and Travis C (eds) History and GIS: Epistemologies, Considerations and Reflections. London: Springer, 153-71.

Harris, TM, Bergeron, S, and Rouse, LJ (2011) Humanities GIS: Place, spatial storytelling, and immersive visualization in the humanities. In Dear M, Ketchum J, Luria S, and Richardson D (eds) GeoHumanities: Art, History, Text at the Edge of Place. New York: Routledge, 226-240.

Harris TM, Corrigan, J, and Bodenhamer DJ (2010) Challenges for the Spatial Humanities: Toward a Research Agenda. In: The Spatial Humanities: GIS and the Future of Humanities Scholarship, Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press,167-176.

Knowles AK (ed) (2008) Placing History: How Maps, Spatial Data, and GIS Are Changing Historixcal Scholarship. Redlands, CA: ESRI Press.

Offen K. (2012) Historical Geography II: Digital Imaginations. In: Progress in Human Geography
(published online 26 November 2012) DOI: 10.1177/0309132512462807
http://phg.sagepub.com/content/early/2012/12/10/0309132512462807

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