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University Symposium on Body & Knowing: What Did We Learn?, May 5, 2010

This discussion is also available as an audio download (.mp3 – 81.7 MB).

In this closing roundtable discussion will once again ask questions about what we know about the body and how we know it, and how people in different times and places have articulated their knowledges about the body. Participants will include Margaret Adamek, Juliette Cherbuliez, Alan Love, and J.B. Shank and the discussion will be moderated by Ann Waltner.

Our experience of the world begins with our bodies, and our bodies and those of others are a source of endless fascination to us. The 2008-10 University Symposium on Body & Knowing has examined the human body both as an object of study and as a producer of knowledge. The symposium welcomes contributions from scientists who study the body from the standpoint of modern biomedicine; from social scientists and humanists who look at the body from their own disciplinary perspectives, and from artists who make art about bodies and/or art using their bodies. We welcome the participation of people who are activists in fields such as health care and disability studies. In this closing roundtable discussion will once again ask questions about what we know about the body and how we know it, and how people in different times and places have articulated their knowledges about the body.

Maggi Adamek is Executive Vice-President and Principal of Fourth Sector Consulting, which provides strategic services to multi-sector collaborations engaging in systems, policy, and environmental change associated with sustainability, food systems, and livable communities. She is also an affiliate research faculty member at the Center for Rural Design of the University of Minnesota.

Juliette Cherbuliez is a professor of French at the University of Minnesota. Her research is on premodern literature and culture. Within this field, she has a broad range of interests, including: the ethics of violence, women as political subjects, garden architecture and public space, history of the book, and exile.

Alan Love is a professor of the Philosophy of Science at the University of Minnesota. His research has concentrated on the concepts of evolutionary innovation and novelty, which have been at the center of the research agenda articulated by many biologists situated in evolutionary developmental biology.

J.B. Shank is a professor of history at the University of MInnesota, and one of the organizers of the IAS sponsored Theorizing Early Modern Studies Collaborative. His recent publications include Before Voltaire: Newton, “Newtonianism,” and the Beginning of the Enlightenment in France (2005) and Neither Natural Philosophy, Nor Science, Nor Literature: Gender and the Pursuit of Nature in Fontenelle’ s Entretiens (2005).

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